YA writer

On being a YA writer: Kerry Drewery interview

Head In A Book is a cycle of literature events in Hull scheduled throughout the year to maintain the momentum of the annual Humber Mouth Literature Festival. At a recent event, Stephanie Cox, met author Kerry Drewery and interviewed her about her books, her writing technique, and the categorisation of literature.

1. Please tell me a little bit about yourself and your career.

Although I’ve always made up stories in my head (even as a child) it was never something I thought I’d be able to do as a career – at school the idea of being a writer certainly was never an option. (I did learn to touch type at school though and I actually enjoy the physical act of typing, which I suppose is a good job!). I’ve had a multitude of different jobs including legal secretary, bank clerk, shop assistant, faculty clerk in a university and learnt a lot about what I don’t like doing! When my youngest son started school, I was looking at returning to work. I’d written a novel in the evenings while he was young, had sent it out to agents and got nowhere, but it had got me thinking that if I didn’t really strive for it then, then I never would. I returned to uni, got a first class honours degree in Professional Writing and wrote another novel on the course. That wasn’t taken either, but I did rewrite it into script and submitted it to a BBC writing competition which I was shortlisted for. Following the degree, and working part-time as a BookStart co-ordinator (which was a great job!) I wrote another novel (my third now), which turned into A Brighter Fear – my first to be published. The funding in my area for BookStart was taken as I was offered my publishing deal.

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Public Speaking Tips

Public Speaking Tips for Authors: Interview with Nancy Buffington

This is a guest post from Stacy Ennis. Stacy is a book and magazine editor, writer, book coach, and speaker, as well as the author of The Editor’s Eye: A Practical Guide to Transforming Your Book from Good to Great. She works with a wide range of clients, from celebrities and corporate clients to independent authors and small book presses and also ghostwrites magazine articles, web content, and books, often reaching national and international audiences.

Public speaking and writing seem opposite of one another, yet both are necessary to become a successful author. Nancy Buffington is a public speaking coach who helps authors improve their presence in front of audiences. Here is an interview with Nancy.

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Digital Marketing insights

Digital Marketing insights from Katie Sadler [HARPER COLLINS]

This is a guest interview with Katie Sadler. Katie is Senior Marketing Manager at Harper Collins and focuses on HarperVoyager (science fiction and fantasy) and HarperImpulse (romance) lists. Follow @katiemorwenna for more.

1. You have been at Harper Collins for over 3 years now. What’s been the biggest development you’ve seen in how you run digital marketing campaigns during that time?

I think when I started, there was a sense of “if you build it, they will come” – a lot of micro sites and games and videos. People were spending their budget creating incredible content, but there wasn’t any cohesive strategy of how to actually get people interacting with it, and converting people to buy the book. Today there is still amazing content being produced to support a book launch, but I think we try much harder to make sure that it isn’t just released into a vacuum.

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Puffin imprint

Creating a long-lasting brand: Tips from the Puffin imprint

BookMachine wanted to find out more about Puffin and how the successful imprint has stood the test of time. This is a guest interview with Amanda Punter, Publishing Director.

Amanda began her career at Scholastic Children’s books where she worked with authors such as Markus Zusak and Philip Reeve. She then moved to Puffin where she became Editorial Director and subsequently Publisher for YA fiction. In 2011 she was appointed Publishing Director for  Puffin fiction – a list that includes Puffin Classics and Roald Dahl, as well as global superstar authors Jeff Kinney (Diary of a Wimpy Kid) and John Green (The Fault in Our Stars). Puffin is part of Penguin Random House Children’s.

1. Why do you think the Puffin imprint has stood the test of time?

The two biggest reasons are I think interlinked.

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IPG award

5 Questions for Tom Bonnick, IPG winner

Tom Bonnick is Business Development Manager at Nosy Crow, and winner of the IPG Young Independent Publisher of the Year award at last week’s awards. We wanted to find out more.

1) Nosy Crow are winning all the awards at the moment – what a great time for your team to be rewarded for all your efforts. What do you think the key to all the success is?

A number of things! It’s an incredible company, filled with people who are immensely creative, intelligent and passionate about what they do. I think our small size and independence help: being small means that we’re able to act and make decisions quickly, and being independent not only allows us to experiment with new ideas, but also means that we have to absolutely believe in every book and app that we publish (our founder and managing director is fond of saying that it’s money she could otherwise be spending on cheese and wine). Most importantly, we work with absolutely amazing authors and illustrators to make incredible books.

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Amazon and publishing

5 Questions for Deborah Emin about Amazon and publishing

This is a guest interview with Deborah Emin. Deborah began Sullivan Street Press as a way to change the publishing paradigm. An advocate also for how we relate to this planet, the press publishes titles on veganism, animal rights as well as on the occupy movement. Follow @SullivanStPress.

1. If we could turn back time, how could the Amazon/publishing relationship have been established differently?

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