BookMachine is a site about publishing. We run events and we post news, views & interviews. Join us on Twitter and Facebook, or sign up to our Mailing list.

Error: Only up to 6 widgets are supported in this layout. If you need more add your own layout.

Momentum launches digital romance imprint

Having seemingly realised that the market for this kind of thing isn’t going away any time soon, Pan Macmilan Australia’s digital imprint, Momentum, has launched another new imprint, Momentum Moonlight, dedicated to publishing romance, erotica and new adult titles (the new adult titles presumably falling on the grown-up Twilight, less-chaste epic romance end of the spectrum than the post-adolescence Hunger Games, where there’s no time for love what with all the dystopianism). Around the imprint, it also aims to build up an online community of romance readers, centred around a blog to which community members can contribute.

Continue Reading No Comments

Filming begins on adaptation of Martin Amis’ London Fields

Since you’ve probably already hit Booker Prize news saturation point, today we’ll instead bring you news that apparently we’ve hit that point in the decade where someone thinks trying to adapt a Martin Amis novel for the cinema is a good idea, 10-15 years seemingly being the amount of time that needs to pass between efforts for everyone to forget that such endeavours have, to date, proven fools’ errands. Following the less than enthusiastically-received big screen versions of The Rachel Papers (1989) and Dead Babies (2000), filming started this week in London on London Fields – one of Amis’ most consistently popular works – with a screenplay penned by the author himself, a cast including Amber Heard, Billy Bob Thornton and Jim Sturgess and, in Mathew Cullen, a debuting director with years of experience making music videos.

Continue Reading No Comments

Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordon releasing memoir

Iconic Sonic Youth co-founder Kim Gordon is set to join her fellow alt-nation heroes Beastie Boys, Peter Hook and R. Kelly in releasing a memoir covering her time in the band. Taking the typically classy tack of not punning on the title of a Sonic Youth release – (I Got A) Catholic Book, Rain Kim, Tunic (Book for Karen), Kim Gordon and the Arthur Conan Doyle Hand Cream just some of the missed opportunities – the book will be entitled Girl in a Band, neatly reflecting her position as both the lone woman in Sonic Youth’s line-up and one of American indie-rock’s most prominent feminists.

Continue Reading No Comments

Seek permission before reproducing something

Tom ChalmersTom Chalmers is Managing Director at IPR License.

The writer Charles Caleb Colton once said that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery but in reality that’s not always true, and I’m not just referring to the mocking of Craig David from the old Bo’ Selecta days. In publishing imitation can often be more aligned with litigation than flattery, especially when you throw that dreaded word plagiarism into the mix.

Continue Reading No Comments

41 Dr. Seuss ebooks forthcoming from Random House

‘I do not like my books in print

I do not like having to squint

I only read my books on Kindle

Anything else seems like a swindle’

…might be the weird Green Eggs and Ham-influenced manner in which a particularly bright yet techno-snobbish child would care to tell the world that it had not yet been exposed to the iconic works of Dr. Seuss due to their only being available in print and not digitally. Although in that case, if it hadn’t actually read the book, how would it be able to make a reference like that? Let’s not think too deeply about this. The point is, as of this month, Random House will be filling a void in that delightfully uppity child’s life, with the first batch of a planned 41 digital releases from the erstwhile Theodor Geisel’s bibliography.

Continue Reading No Comments

Creative Skillset seeking views of publishing professionals

Creative Skillset – the licensed Sector Skills Council whose remit encompasses publishing, alongside entertainment media, fashion, marketing and communications – is looking for publishing professionals to participate in its industry panels, giving feedback that it says ‘will be vital in shaping future strategies and supporting the UK Creative Industries in remaining globally competitive’. Over a maximum of four ten question online surveys a year, contributors will be asked their opinions on relevant concerns such as skills gaps, training and the industry’s future needs.

Continue Reading No Comments

bookmachine.me launch events announced

Since everyone else is talking about it anyway, we might as well drop any kind of modesty and also provide you with a plug for the global launch night for BookMachine’s online networking platform, bookmachine.me, which is taking place on 25 September with six events in six cities around the world. The new site – will be inaugurated with events in London, Oxford, Brighton, Barcelona, New York and Toronto, and Phil Collins will be at all of them each with its own unique speaker for the night.

Continue Reading No Comments

‘New’ J.D. Salinger work apparently forthcoming

Next month brings with it an onslaught of J.D. Salinger-related paraphernalia, with a new biography and associated documentary on the late author both due for release, for anyone who really wants to hear about it: where he was born, what his lousy childhood was like, and how his parents were occupied and all before they had him, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, since he didn’t really feel like going into it. What’s more, the authors of that biography say even more Salingernalia is forthcoming: The Associated Press took receipt of an early copy of Salinger and discovered therein that authors David Shields and Shane Salerno claim that ‘between 2015 and 2020, a series of posthumous Salinger releases are planned’.

Continue Reading No Comments

FlatandJuicy launches Kickstarter for science ebook platform

FlatandJuicy – a company that aims to, in its own words, ‘provide a visual and creative voice for science, technology and cultural R&D expeditions’ – yesterday launched a Kickstarter for an ebook platform that hopes to do just that, providing ‘visual and creative interpretations’ of research missions worldwide. The campaign is to fund the publication of its first title, City of Elephants, focusing on The Berenike Project, a 30-year archaeological mission started in Egypt in 1994 that encompasses ‘war elephants, ancient cities, weapons, ships and armies, ambition and power in the ancient world – in a time when Greek kings sponsored science, learning, technology and exploration’.

Continue Reading No Comments

From small eggs grow mighty IPOs: cracking open the Chegg story

Anna FahertyThis is a guest post from Anna Faherty, an experienced publisher and an award-winning writer and lecturer. Anna teaches on the Kingston University Publishing MA and also works on print and digital projects across the publishing and museum sectors. Her online training courses are used by a wide range of professionals, including global publishers. Follow her on Twitter at @mafunyane.

 

Textbook rental company Chegg announced last week it was hoping to raise $150m in an initial public offering (IPO) on the New York Stock Exchange. So what’s the inside track on the company that was most recently valued at $800m?

Continue Reading 1 Comment

EL James highest-earning author in world, surprising no one

To the surprise of hopefully very few who have so much as glanced at a bestseller list since spring of 2012, business magazine Forbes’ annually released figures of the biggest sellers in publishing have revealed that, between June 2012 and June 2013, the highest-earning author in the world was EL James, the first-time novelist whose Fifty Shades of Grey trilogy has made her $95 million (£65 million) over that twelve month period. James’ closest rival was veteran airport standby James Patterson, whose books have sold over 270 million copies since the publication of his debut novel, The Thomas Berryman Number, in 1976, and who made $91 million in the same timeframe. Both authors’ sales dwarfed third-placed Suzanne Collins, whose Hunger Games trilogy made her a mere $55 million, presumably helped along by the highly lucrative film adaptation of the trilogy’s first instalment. I’m sure she’s inconsolable.

Continue Reading 1 Comment

Get BookMachine in your inbox

Given email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.
Please provide a valid email address.
Thank you, your sign-up request was successful! Please check your e-mail inbox.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Please fill in the required fields.