Posts Tagged ‘books’

Food writers award grants £2,000

The inaugural Jane Grigson Trust Award, designed to support new food writers is currently open for submissions, with the deadline for entries being the end of this month, 31 October 2015.

This award was created in honour of the twenty-fifth anniversary of Jane Grigson’s death, and will be made to a writer new to food writing who has already received a commission from a publishing house. In the spirit of Grigson’s writing, the award will be for a non-fiction book on food in the widest sense, from any genre – cook book, memoir, travel, history – so long as the primary subject is food.

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Fake Reviewers

Refugee libraries in Calais and beyond

There is a common misconception that refugee camps are temporary structures, built to house a population consistently on the move. The truth of the matter is, however, that these structures can remain in place for a long time and develop a life of their own.

Just like any other town, long-term refugee camps require supplies and structures to help their inhabitants learn and develop. The ability to access books and learning materials are crucial to this, and it’s often done through libraries.

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10 things we learnt from the first Nosy Crow Illustrator Salon

BookMachine were at The Book Club last night for the first installment of the new Nosy Crow Illustrator Salons. Steven Lenton, author-illustrator of Princess Daisy and the Dragon (and the Nincompoop Knights) and illustrator of the Shifty McGifty and Slippery Sam picture books, was interviewed by Kate Wilson, Managing Director of Nosy Crow.  Their friendly repartee set the tone for the evening and was demonstrative of Nosy Crow’s ability to develop and nurture great relationships with those they work with. To round up the night, we’ve put together a list of 10 things we learnt.

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Fake Reviewers

Balancing Act: Keeping publishing’s polarities in check

Publishing is an industry that operates between polarities, constantly engaging a series of balancing acts that define the kinds of books we sell and the profit margins we make. But are there canaries in the cage that tell us when we’re veering too far one way or the other? Is it possible to tell when the balance is out of sync before we reach the tipping point? And has the digital revolution of the past few years changed that?

Walking the tightrope

“We need writers who know the difference between production of a market commodity and the practice of an art,” said Ursula K. le Guin in July’s Portland Monthly. “Developing written material to suit sales strategies in order to maximize corporate profit… is not quite the same thing as responsible book publishing or authorship.”

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Books On The Underground

On launching Books On The Underground: Hollie Belton interview

You just finished that amazing book you’ve been reading, and you want to share it with the world? Well that’s what Hollie Belton wanted to do, so she created Books On The Underground. Here Stephanie Cox interviews Hollie about how it all works and what we should look out for next from the creative due behind this successful venture.

1. Please introduce yourself, and the others behind Books on the Underground, and give us a brief overview of your careers?

I’m Hollie, I started Books on the Underground in November 2012. I’m originally from Lincolnshire, but I moved to London 7 years ago after graduating from university. I’m a Creative at an Advertising agency, where I’ve been for the last 4 years. I met my BOTU partner, Cordelia, on Twitter. She reached out to me to to help out and now has become an integral part of the project and we’ve been doing it together ever since.

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Bookmate competition to win 500,000 books

The problem today is that people have no time to read. We also spend more and more time on our phones for entertainment, news, emails, banking – many things that we used to do on a personal computer or offline. It’s easier to read on our phones because everything is in one place; often we’re catching ten minutes on the tube or reading just before we go to bed. Subscription is also becoming a new norm for content streaming, with Spotify and Netflix bringing music and films to people in new ways. Books are no exception, and Bookmate is part of the new wave of services providing ebook streaming via a fantastically designed mobile application. For no more than the price of a single paperback, users can access a library of 500,000 ebooks via a library on mobile, tablet and web that allows them to read online and offline. 

On Bookmate people come for the ebooks but stay for the social experience – you can create a profile and share your favourite books with your friends. We’re really excited to be partnering with BookMachine, and to mark our collaboration BookMachine has created an incredibly useful bookshelf of publishing-related books: Together we’re running a competition to give you free access to this bookshelf and the 500,000 books on Bookmate for free. All you have to do is go over to BookMachine’s Facebook, like the latest post, and like Bookmate International’s page to enter.

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Publishing yourself

Publishing Yourself

Lisa Edwards runs her own independent publishing consultancy, Redwood Tree Publishing. She has twenty years’ experience in the publishing industry, primarily in children’s books, where she has managed brands such as Horrible Histories, The Golden Compass, The Hunger Games, Tom Gates and Stick Man. She is currently developing and leading a training course for trade commissioning editors at The Publishing Training Centre. 

As the one-year anniversary of my blog hoves into view, I’ve realised that what I’ve been doing all this time is publishing myself.

I haven’t been self-publishing, as to me that means something different – the act of distributing a single novel, short story or work of non fiction online is very different to publishing a series of micro-works via a website.

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Talking About Books to a Global Audience

This is a guest post by Rob Chilver. Rob is a Social Media assistant for Waterstones, working on a number of mediums from blogging to Twitter and Instagram. He also writes about books at and hosts a fortnightly books podcast. He can be found on Twitter and on Instagram: @robchilver

I wouldn’t have guessed when I began working as a Christmas temp at a small town Waterstones that I’d end up in Head Office with a view of the London skyline. Yet, from talking to customers on the shop floor to interacting with them on social media and blogs, the core concepts have remained the same. Here’s what I learnt along the way.

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Comics and publishing

An interview with Tim Pilcher ahead of BookMachine Brighton

This is a guest interview with Tim Pilcher. Tim has spent over 25 years working in comics and publishing at DC Comics’ Vertigo imprint, Comics International, Penguin, Dorling Kindersley and Ilex Press. He is the current chair of the Comic Book Alliance and is the author of over 18 books. He is the editor of Brighton: The Graphic Novel, and the forthcoming, Brighton’s Graphic War. He is currently Humanoids’ UK liaison and has lectured on comics at Trinity College, UCL, Imperial War Museum, ICA and The British Library. Follow @Tim_Pilcher or sign up to BookMachine Brighton on Monday 23rd February.

1. How do you think that comics are going to evolve in the next 3-5 years?

Well, digital comics are constantly evolving and there are more and more online portals setting up. Comixology is the daddy (and now owned by Amazon) but Sequential are a fast-growing company to watch, who provide tons of non-superhero comics online. But I think where comics are really going to evolve is not so much in delivery platforms, but more in the breadth of topics that the medium explores. In Japan non-fiction manga is well-established, but that’s an area that’s just starting to grow with titles like Darryl Cunningham’s Science Tales and Supercrash: How to Hijack the Global Economy. Reportage is another area for growth, thanks to the work of Joe Sacco (Footnotes in Gaza, The Fixer, etc.)  I think the comic book “memoir” has become an overcrowded market and I’d like to see more creators actually approaching the graphic novel as a NOVEL, that is contemporary fiction drawn in a sequential manner. The best recent example of this is Glyn Dillon’s The Nao of Brown.

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Emerging authors

One Big Book Launch opens for submissions from emerging authors

Collaborative book launch initiative is back for another year

It’s an important day today as submissions are now open to find outstanding authors for One Big Book Launch, the event that gives ten emerging authors the opportunity to launch their books to an audience of over two hundred readers and press.

After attending last year and witnessing ten talented authors from Egmont, Bloomsbury, No Exit Press, and a number of independents; BookMachine are delighted to be supporting the event in 2015, and discovering new authors writing on the theme of ‘Inspiring People and Places’.

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