Posts Tagged ‘Marketing’

phil williams

A misnomer: why successful self-publishing is the opposite of going it alone

This is a Guest Post by Phil Williams on how collaboration is key to successful self-publishing. Phil is a writer and English tutor based in Brighton. Outside his position as a Communications Manager for social support platform Mifinder, he blogs about copywriting, creative writing and the English language, and has self-published two novels and an advanced English grammar guide.

Continue Reading No Comments

Lottie Chase

The next 5 years of publishing: jetpacks and hoverboards [OPINION]

In the run up to Publishing: the next 5 years, BookMachine will be featuring a number of opinions about what might be next for the industry. This is a guest blog from Lottie Chase. Lottie is the Sales Manager of Legend Press, a publisher passionate about championing new and high-profile authors and ensuring the book remains a product of beauty, enjoyment and fulfilment. She was the Chair of the Society of Young Publishers and has previously worked in export sales at both Walker Books and Quercus.

Continue Reading No Comments

social media manager

Tips on working as a social media manager: Maya Ninel Robert interview

Maya Ninel Robert is the Social Producer for Mashable in the UK. Previously to this she worked for the publisher, Pan Macmillan. Here Norah Myers interviews Maya about her great job, and about working with social media.

1. Please take us through a ‘day in the life’ in your work as a social media manager.

In any one day, I’ll start by looking at what’s currently being shared and talked about on various social media platforms, looking out for trending conversations and comparing our content’s performance. A large bulk of my job is scheduling out our own content on our platforms, and seeing through a strategy that I have developed. I’m constantly on the look-out to identify gaps in the market, too, and relaying that back to my team. I work very analytically, so a lot of my day is spent testing content and reporting back useful data to my team or outlying a strategy I think would benefit our community.

Continue Reading No Comments

Authors marketing

Authors marketing themselves online: the components of a strategy

Mike Shatzkin has been in publishing since 1962. Since 1979, Mike has been an independent consultant (The Idea Logical Company) with clients that have included most major publishers in the US and UK, retailers including Barnes & Noble and Borders, wholesalers including Ingram, and a host of tech startups. He has partnerships with Michael Cader in a conference business (Publishers Launch Conferences) and with Peter McCarthy in a digital marketing business (Logical Marketing Agency). You can follow him on Twitter @MikeShatzkin.

A range of useful options is available to any author as they consider their online presences. All can be useful to any author but their own website is an essential component of that. It’s an anchor and it is the only web presence the author knows s/he will always control.

An author’s objectives for a website should be to:

  • Make it crystal clear to search engines who the author is and for what they are an authority.
  • Give the author a platform that can be used for many things: blogging, posting parts of books or works-in-progress, and gathering email addresses.
  • Give fans of the author a sensible place to link to an author’s content and biography that is not called
  • Collect data that is independent of any specific book’s sales that can help an author know how s/he is doing in the digital world.

In addition to a web site, which is real estate an author totally controls and is the most important tool in an author’s kit to get new followers through search, an author can do him or herself some good by going where fans could be.

Continue Reading 21 Comments

future of the book

Open access matters to more than academics, and here’s why

This is a guest post from Alison Jones. Alison is a business and executive coach, content consultant and publisher. After a 23-year career in trade and scholarly publishing working with major publishers such as Oxford University Press and Macmillan, during which she pioneered digital publishing, she set up Alison Jones Business Services and the Practical Inspiration Publishing imprint in 2014.

Scholarly publishing – the making public of research across the various fields of science, social sciences and humanities – has been in a state of disruption for decades now. The classic outputs, little changed for centuries, have been the journal article and the monograph, and the traditional customer and curator of the content remains the university library, but the World Wide Web – originally designed for the communication of scholarly material, of course – disrupted the established print models, and publishers and academics alike have been exploring, exploiting and expanding the possibilities ever since.

But why should you as a non-academic pay any attention? Well, if you care about communicating your ideas, and the most brilliant minds in the world are focused on communicating their ideas in new and innovative ways, it’s probably worthwhile seeing what they are coming up with.

Continue Reading 1 Comment

Fake Reviewers

Imaginative Space: The role of the faceless model on fiction book covers

There is a growing tradition in book publishing to use faceless models on book covers. Tried and tested, models whose faces are hidden are good at selling books. But what’s the psychological process behind this trend? What are the consequences of this marketing method for the reader and should we be keeping an eye on them?

Faceless models in advertising

Continue Reading 1 Comment

Digital Marketing insights

Digital Marketing insights from Katie Sadler [HARPER COLLINS]

This is a guest interview with Katie Sadler. Katie is Senior Marketing Manager at Harper Collins and focuses on HarperVoyager (science fiction and fantasy) and HarperImpulse (romance) lists. Follow @katiemorwenna for more.

1. You have been at Harper Collins for over 3 years now. What’s been the biggest development you’ve seen in how you run digital marketing campaigns during that time?

I think when I started, there was a sense of “if you build it, they will come” – a lot of micro sites and games and videos. People were spending their budget creating incredible content, but there wasn’t any cohesive strategy of how to actually get people interacting with it, and converting people to buy the book. Today there is still amazing content being produced to support a book launch, but I think we try much harder to make sure that it isn’t just released into a vacuum.

Continue Reading No Comments

Books Are My Bag Campaign Announced, Targeting Bookshops, Readers and Cockhats

If the internet has proven anything, it’s that if someone famous does something, normos (everyone who is non-famous) will also do it in a misjudged attempt to be famous. That, and the fact there’s no such thing as private messages. Both these lessons came to the fore last week in the aftermath of the London Book Fair, where the Bookseller Association announced the advent of the Books Are My Bag campaign (a high street campaign to make reading seem even cooler than it already is with branded merchandise), and Tom Tivnan from The Bookseller sent an incredibly acerbic email to a photographer that was subsequently forwarded to the inbox of pretty much everyone in the trade.

Continue Reading No Comments

5 Questions for Peter McKay and Rachel Maund [INTERVIEW]







The Publishing Training Centre and Marketability are working together to promote training.

Preliminary step towards takeover? Absolutely not, says the PTC’s Peter McKay and Marketability’s Rachel Maund, who are cheerfully adamant that recent announcement is a pragmatic response to falling training budgets and recognition that it makes more sense to collaborate than it does to compete. Lottie Chase, Marketing Executive interviews the two about the new partnership.

Continue Reading No Comments

A Publisher’s Most Valuable Property: Their Website

The internet has changed a lot in the last ten years. Well, even in the last two. Maybe even in the last week. Ok, so it’s ever-changing. New languages are being developed and perfected all the time, and the rise of apps plus innovative web design means users expect a different browsing experience. With more people than ever before buying and browsing books online, publishers have a real opportunity to go head to head with other retailers (should they so wish) by investing a massive amount in their web presence. And no, I’m not talking about setting up a Twitter account that auto-Tweets links to Amazon.

Continue Reading 1 Comment

Get BookMachine in your inbox