Posts Tagged ‘publishers’

Publishers Association

PA encourages UK Publishers to go to school

Did you always know you wanted to work in publishing? No? Many young people don’t know about the industry and all the opportunities it provides. The Publishers Association have launched a new programme where people in publishing go into schools, colleges and universities to share their knowledge.

We all know that publishers are conscious of the need to attract a wider range of people to its workforce. However, to make this happen young people need to know about the wide range of jobs and opportunities on offer. This is the aim of this new initiative, to share knowledge so that it is seen as a viable career option from an early age.

To get involved, people are being asked to volunteer as publishing ambassadors with their local schools. This can be done be contacting schools, colleges or universities in their local area or previously attended by the person. Alternatively it will be possible to register on the PA’s People Database to receive updates on upcoming opportunities to give hold a session.

To make such visits as easy as possible, The PA has created a wide variety of digital resources accessible via Dropbox. The resources can be tailored and adapted to suit the user’s style and content. They include:

  • PowerPoint presentations
  • Scripts
  • Leaflets
  • Tips for presenters

For more information please contact Seonaid smacleod@publishers.org.uk

 

Rory Scarfe

On publishing top authors: Rory Scarf interview

Rory Scarfe spent ten years as a non-fiction publisher, most recently as the director of the HarperSport division of HarperCollins, where he published some of the biggest names in sport, including Mike Tyson, Usain Bolt, and Team Sky. He joined Furniss Lawton in 2014, where he works with a range of non-fiction and fiction authors. Here Norah Myers interviews him about the new venture.

Dodo copy

From book blogger to independent publisher

This is a guest blog by Thom Cuell. Thom is the Managing Director of Dodo Ink, an independent publisher specialising in difficult and daring fiction. His writing has appeared in 3am Magazine, The Weeklings and The Literateur, and he has an MA in English and American Literature from The University of Manchester.

From the outside, the publishing world can seem like a scary place. The image of the stuffy Old Boys’ club might be a little outdated, but breaking in is still tough. Moving to London, or taking an unpaid internship, isn’t for everyone. But are there alternative routes into publishing? I’d like to tell you a bit about how I went from amateur book blogger to Managing Director of an independent press.

Books On The Underground

On launching Books On The Underground: Hollie Belton interview

You just finished that amazing book you’ve been reading, and you want to share it with the world? Well that’s what Hollie Belton wanted to do, so she created Books On The Underground. Here Stephanie Cox interviews Hollie about how it all works and what we should look out for next from the creative due behind this successful venture.

1. Please introduce yourself, and the others behind Books on the Underground, and give us a brief overview of your careers?

I’m Hollie, I started Books on the Underground in November 2012. I’m originally from Lincolnshire, but I moved to London 7 years ago after graduating from university. I’m a Creative at an Advertising agency, where I’ve been for the last 4 years. I met my BOTU partner, Cordelia, on Twitter. She reached out to me to to help out and now has become an integral part of the project and we’ve been doing it together ever since.

Authors marketing

Authors marketing themselves online: the components of a strategy

Mike Shatzkin has been in publishing since 1962. Since 1979, Mike has been an independent consultant (The Idea Logical Company) with clients that have included most major publishers in the US and UK, retailers including Barnes & Noble and Borders, wholesalers including Ingram, and a host of tech startups. He has partnerships with Michael Cader in a conference business (Publishers Launch Conferences) and with Peter McCarthy in a digital marketing business (Logical Marketing Agency). You can follow him on Twitter @MikeShatzkin.

A range of useful options is available to any author as they consider their online presences. All can be useful to any author but their own website is an essential component of that. It’s an anchor and it is the only web presence the author knows s/he will always control.

An author’s objectives for a website should be to:

  • Make it crystal clear to search engines who the author is and for what they are an authority.
  • Give the author a platform that can be used for many things: blogging, posting parts of books or works-in-progress, and gathering email addresses.
  • Give fans of the author a sensible place to link to an author’s content and biography that is not called Amazon.com.
  • Collect data that is independent of any specific book’s sales that can help an author know how s/he is doing in the digital world.

In addition to a web site, which is real estate an author totally controls and is the most important tool in an author’s kit to get new followers through search, an author can do him or herself some good by going where fans could be.

Fake Reviewers

Imaginative Space: The role of the faceless model on fiction book covers

There is a growing tradition in book publishing to use faceless models on book covers. Tried and tested, models whose faces are hidden are good at selling books. But what’s the psychological process behind this trend? What are the consequences of this marketing method for the reader and should we be keeping an eye on them?

Faceless models in advertising

Oxford Publishing Conference

Eric Huang on ‘Is your brand as important as your product?’

Interested in finding out more about the Oxfordshire Publishing Group Summer Conference? We are – so in the run up to the event BookMachine is running a series of speaker interviews. First up is Eric Huang, Director of Made in Me. Eric will be discussing: ‘Is your brand as important as your product?

1. Interesting topic. What made you focus on this area?

I have always been interested in this. For me, publishing has always been about the brand, or the story, before the format. My first real job was at Disney, and naturally this was the focus there – it taught me that the format isn’t the end of all the hard work, but the beginning. If you’re a publisher you make a book, but it really doesn’t end there.

SEO Tips for Publishers

5 SEO Tips for Publishers and Authors

This is a guest post by Georgiana Ghiciuc. Georgiana is lead content strategist for Beaglecat, an inbound marketing agency with clients in Austria, Germany and the US.

SEO can be life changing, when you know the rules of the game.

SEO Tips for Publishers

Source: Pixabay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Over the past few years, most publishers have been exposed to the idea that, unless you follow a number of SEO guidelines, Google won’t index you, people won’t read your work and you will endure eternal oblivion.

As with everything, SEO rules should be taken with a pinch of salt. Here are some basic tips to help you rank better.

Mills and Boon

Romancing the Reader – Relationship advice from the Mills & Boon archive

This is a guest post from Judith Watts. Judith lectures on the Publishing Masters at Kingston University where she is Co-Director of Kingston University Press. She is researching for her PhD [The Limits of Desire: the Mills & Boon Romance Market] in The Archive of British Publishing and Printing at the University of Reading. She has worked in the industry for many years and has recently started two new reading, writing and publishing  businesses. She took a publishing career break to do an MFA in Creative Writing and is a published poet and author of Hodder’s Teach Yourself Erotic Fiction. 

At a recent Galley Club talk I confessed my passion for publishing archives. The past has much to teach us about relationship management. The thousands of intimate letters between publishers, authors and readers are a tale of the ultimate ménage à trois. While a partnership of two can be tricky enough the publisher can always tie the contractual knot with the author. But how can readers be wooed and kept close?

Attend the Self-Publishing Summit

Ever since 50 Shades of Grey landed on bookshelves, however well hidden, the talk of self-publishing has gone up several decibels. There are now authors saying publishers are no longer needed, stories of great success and precious money thrown away for murky services.

Each year, market-leading self-publishing company New Generation Publishing runs the Self-Publishing Summit, taking place this year at King’s College London on 9th November, to help define the opportunities within the hyperbole and to provide wide-range advice from industry professionals.

And this year the Summit will see some exceptional panels look at the key topics for writers – including the role of agents, editing, production marketing, sales, as well as an overview of the industry and a final Q&A. There will also be a chance to speak to the panelists and fellow attendees during coffee breaks.

The panels includes top publishers, agents, editors, authors, journalists and marketers – an opportunity not to be missed for aspiring, or published, writers.

Tickets for the event cost £34.99 (+VAT) and are booked on a first come first served basis. The event is sponsored by Ingram Spark and you can see full details of the event and can book your tickets by clicking here.

Get BookMachine in your inbox