Author: Kaz Harrison

Melody Dawes

Keeping publishing flexible through outsourcing: interview with Just Content

Melody Dawes is the Managing Director of Just Content. With 20 years’ experience in educational and academic publishing, she set up Just Content in 2013, offering publishers and content providers an on-demand solution for outsourcing at scale.

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Ever Dundas

Introducing the Crip Collective: interview with Ever Dundas

What is the Crip Collective?

Crip Collective is an informal Facebook group for disabled people working in the publishing industry in the UK (including emerging writers and publishing students – all welcome!). The group is there to provide mutual support, share resources, and discuss the challenges we face in the industry.

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Ken Jones

Frustrated with EPUB? You need OMGPUB!

For illustrated publishers, interactive EPUB has never really worked. Typical reflowable EPUBs are too plain and simplistic and although visually rich and interactive EPUBs are possible, they are too hard to make, too hard to distribute and too hard for readers to be able to read.

We need a better solution, a new style of ebook that can be more easily created and can then be securely delivered to any reader on any device, we need ‘OMGPUB’!

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John Pettigrew

Get ready for the Day of Code 2019: interview with John Pettigrew

On Friday 22 November 2019, before this year’s Futurebook conference, 40 delegates from across the publishing industry will attend the very first Day of Code at Hachette HQ in London. There, under the guidance of a team of 15 coaches, they will work in teams to build their own websites, and discover the power of code in practice. In this interview, Day of Code coach John Pettigrew previews the event and explains why coding is important for today’s publishers.

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FutureBook Conference

Event Report: BookMachine Unplugged – Talking Audio

On Wednesday 25 September, a packed house of audiophiles gathered in London’s Century Club for the very first BookMachine Unplugged: Talking Audio event. BookMachine editorial board member Louise Newton (Audio Editor, Little Brown) introduced a panel of experts with an outstanding range of experience between them: Catherine Daly (Audio Editor, Faber & Faber), Paul Stark (Audio and Digital Manager, Orion Publishing Group), Helena Sheffield (Marketing & Communications Manager, Penguin Random House Audio) and Sarah Shrubb (Audio Publisher, Hachette Audio).

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Claire Ormsby-Potter

Event report: BookMachine Meets Bloomsbury Publishing

On 19th September, BookMachine hosted its second BookMachine Meets… event in collaboration with the Bloomsbury Institute (@BloomsburyInst on Twitter). Held in the beautiful Bloomsbury HQ in the middle of actual Bloomsbury, the whole event had a wonderfully literary feel before the night had even started. The event was sold out, so there was a lively atmosphere as everyone gathered for pre-talk drinks in the conservatory, and I felt extremely fancy.

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Jenny Knight

Language barriers: navigating the world of publishing jargon

In the BookMachine Editorial Board, we’ve been discussing the barriers that prevent people getting into the publishing industry. One of the factors that keep outsiders outside is our love of specialist terminology – if you’re not already connected to someone ‘in the biz’, it can feel daunting getting to grips with all the procedures, stages and random bits of jargon many of us use every day. We’ll be looking at this issue from a staff point of view in future, but we’re delighted to have author Jenny Knight’s take on the subject here.

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Kit Caless

Like and subscribe: how Influx Press is connecting with readers

Influx Press is an independent publisher based in north London. Influx is committed to publishing innovative and challenging fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction from across the UK and beyond, and they have just launched a new subscription model for 2020. In this interview, co-founder Kit Caless explains the thinking behind this new project.

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Kristina Bullen

Content vs. Design: a tug of war?

Working in ELT, Content and Design should have a symbiotic relationship. The design supports the content and the content works effortlessly within the parameters of the design. So why does it sometimes feel like a battleground, with both sides vying for a prominent space on the hill?

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Beyond unabridged: the captivating world of audio drama

My name is Jenni Lewis. I’ve worked as a commissioning editor in audio books for 10 years, mainly for Penguin Random House.  My newest challenge has been to commission for the BBC Audio list, with a primary focus on audio drama.

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Rich Hardiman

Vector graphics: a no-nonsense guide

Rich Hardiman, founder of Comic Printing UK, tweets about everything from the best way to format a bleed to Taylor Swift’s latest album, providing useful information and much-needed laughs all in one place. This article is a distillation of a recent thread on vector graphics – we hope you enjoy it as much as we did.

The time has come to talk of vector graphics. Of resolution and .ai formats. Of bitmap art and tricks.

So your standard bit of artwork made in Photoshop or the like will be a bitmap (not the file format, words can mean two things). Whether it’s a tiff, or a psd, or a jpeg, or a PwroNG, it’s rasterised, meaning there are a certain number of pixels and each pixel has data assigned to it

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Bob Cox-Wrightson

Publishing roles beyond the book industry: tips for job seekers and career changers

So you’re looking for a career in publishing – that must mean looking for a job making books for a publishing company, right? Well, in some cases yes, but this is by no means the only route open to you. Publishing, and publishing skills, are applicable to a wide range of interesting roles and diverse industries.

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Anna Cunnane

What publishers need to know about git (distributed version control system)

Git is a free to use distributed version control software for tracking changes in software development. However, the benefits of using a fully-fledged version control system like git don’t just apply to writing software. Whether it’s a bug fix or a paperback edition both publishers and software developers are constantly shipping new products and revising older ones. This means that every day we perform similar sorts of tasks:

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