Author: BookMachine

Co-founder of @bookmachine - the network for forward-thinking #publishing folks; and BookMachine Works - the fresh new creative agency for publishers
Publicity campaign case study

Since launching at The London Book Fair 2017, BookMachine Works – the marketing and events agency arm of BookMachine has worked on a wide range of successful campaigns and events with publishers large and small.

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On Tuesday 6th June 2017, BookMachine and the Frankfurt Book Fair announced their plans, which had been brewing for months. Their first joint event was officially launched: ‘Reinventing Culture: How the Arts Worlds Collide in the Age of Technology’. It’s set to take place on the evening of 5th July 2017 at The Library Private Members Club.

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sophie o'rourke emc design

In August 2016 BookMachine invited a group of publishing-savvy professionals to join its editorial board. This, in short, means that it’s not just the 3 of us (Sam, Laura, Norah) who are thinking about how to publish the best ideas insights about the industry on the site – there is now a group of experienced insiders working on this.

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New home for BookMachine

BookMachine has a new home. It’s a private members club in Covent Garden, aptly called ‘The Lib-rary’. The walls are adorned with bookcases and books. The bar is stocked with ample selection of beers, wines and spirits. There’s a lively main bar area – where our events will take place, and upstairs a number of clusters of chairs where BookMachiners can head for a quieter chat.

For international visitors there are hotels rooms too (we can get you a discount if you are coming to one of our events); and downstairs is a restaurant called Saint Luke. Working with publishers and author chefs – Saint Luke’s has a rotating food menu based on cookbooks – with bookmarkers to denote starters, mains and desserts.  Saint Luke’s Head Chef is Alessio Piras who works with and alongside guest chefs to launch each cookbook.

If you are keen to join us there in 2017, here are some dates for your diaries – topics to be announced soon.

8th Feb 2017 – 6.30pm

29th March 2017 – 6.30pm

27th April 2017 (private party for BookMachine client)

28th June 2017 – 6.30pm

27th September 2017 – 6.30pm

As well as organising our own events, we are able to market, host and organise events for publishers, publishing associations and authors. So if you have something to celebrate we would love to help you – please get in touch.

 

Editorial Director

Editorial Director [JOB POSTING]

At Canelo we are building a different kind of publisher. We take the most exciting stories to the widest possible audience, combining a dynamic digital-centred approach with a fantastic deal for authors.

Just 12 months after our first titles launched, Canelo is already making its mark on the industry, with major acquisitions, acclaimed chart-topping titles, and consistently strong sales growth. But we want to achieve much more, and this new position has been created to realise those ambitions.

About the Role

We need a savvy and enterprising editor with an excellent knowledge of commercial and genre fiction, great relationships in the author and agent communities, and the passion and creativity to uncover and develop bestsellers.

You will have the desire and talent to build something truly significant. We’ll make sure you have the platform and support that successful books demand.

We’re open to flexible working, are an equal opportunities employer, and are happy to discuss further.

Please write to iain@canelo.co.

Crystal Mahey-Morgan is Founder at OWN IT! Entertainment Limited. OWN IT! is a storytelling lifestyle brand, telling stories across books, music, fashion and film. At the heart of everything it does is a desire to share, empower, celebrate and inspire. We wanted to find out more about Crystal and her vision.

1) Your writing has been taken seriously since a young age (16). What helped you to write, and what should budding writers be doing to perfect their craft?

My journalism for me was about sharing my passion about things I loved and expressing an opinion about things I cared about. For The Face Magazine, I wrote about music, fashion and the creativity that was coming from the underground sub-cultures that surrounded me growing up in London. For The Guardian, I wrote articles which included exploring gang culture and the negative effects an irresponsible advertising industry was having on young women growing up. The thing that helped me was everything came from the heart and nothing was forced. I think the best way for budding writers to perfect their craft is not to write what the think will make people like them but to have the confidence to stay true to their ideas, stories, characters etc, as this will probably result in better content.

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The 2016 British Book Design and Production Awards have extended their deadline for entries until the 15th July. That gives you a total of 10 days to get your entries in!

The awards celebrate the best books of 2016 . These include everything from photographic books, art and architecture monographs, to scholarly, academic and reference books. As one of the most prestigious and popular literary events of the year, this is definitely one to get involved in.

The judges will be looking for exceptional design, free of typographical errors, with particular emphasis given to excellent layout and standards of typography.

All books published from 1 July 2015 until 30 June 2016 are eligible for entry in this year’s awards and the deadline for entries has just been extended to Friday 15 July 2016.

The Awards will be presented on Thursday 10 November 2016 at the Jumeirah Carlton Tower Hotel, Knightsbridge,  London and we hope to see lots of you there. It’s bound to be a memorable night for celebrating the best of British book design and production.

 

Over the past 7 years BookMachine have organised over 100 industry events, and listened to over 300 industry speakers kindly share their knowledge. From this, we have learned that that if you want to stay at the forefront of what’s happening, then you need to understand the past and have a sense of what is happening in the future – but you also really need to know what is happening now, both in your discipline and across the indusry.

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BookMachine events

A note about BookMachine events

Over the past fortnight BookMachine have announced their two latest projects – both are publishing events, which will take place in London. They have been designed to attract people from across the trade, those who are looking to meet interesting people whilst learning something new.

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Everyone likes to win an award – it spruces up your CV by showing that you are at the top of your profession, achieving more than the list of tasks on your job spec. It illustrates that others recognize your talents and think highly enough of you to nominate you. It’s like a great big pat on the back.

This is the second annual Unsung Heroes of Publishing list, celebrating talented publishing specialists working in-house or freelance. It was launched last year by Whitefox – the largest curated network of publishing skills and specialisms in the world.

BookMachine’s very own Sam Perkins, has been listed as a 2017 winner. Sam has been managing the BookMachine site since September 2015. She also oversees the annual publication of Snapshots, a collaborative publishing project with Kingston University Publishing MA students. Sam commissions new content on a weekly basis, and also makes sure that it is distributed throughout the industry. She does this week after week, tirelessly, on top of a full-time job at Sage Publications. She is most definitely our hero!

Other winners include Pete Adlington (Canongate), Helen Coyle (Freelance), Jo Forshaw (Harper Collins), Louise Harnby (Freelance), Laura Marchant (Freelance), Emma Paterson (Coleridge &White), Rebecca Ritchie (Curtis Brown), Jill Sawyer (Freelance), Rebecca Servadio (London Literary Scouting), Martin Toseland (Freelance), Mathieu Triay (Penguin), Gemma Wain (Freelance) and Annabel Wilson (Michael Joseph).

Congratulations to everyone on this year’s selection, and particularly to our Sam.

Attending an event on ‘new trends’ seems apt at this time, just as everyone is ramping up on their Frankfurt preparation. We took away much more than 10 lessons from this jam-packed morning – but thought 10 might just whet your appetite for now.

Ruth Jones (Publisher Business Development, Ingram Content Group):

  • Amazon chose to go to market first with books, because books are well-ordered and categorized. Publishers understand their IP and know how to sell under ‘normal’ conditions – which helps to ride any waves of uncertainty and makes experimentation easier to manage.
  • It is thought that young people who spend time online have small attention spans as they constantly engage with bite-size content. This is just not true – they have huge attention spans, but only for content that is relevant, engaging and personalized to them.

Richard Orme (Chief Executive, DAISY Consortium):

  • Captain Ian Fraser lost his sight during Battle of Somme. Because of this, he worked with RNIB to find a reading machine for other blind soldiers. RNIB and DAISY now work with publishers to make sure as many books as possible are published in accessible formats so they can be enjoyed at the same time by anyone, regardless of their reading requirements or preferences.
  • The Marrakesh Treaty facilitates access to published works for people who are blind, visually impaired or print disabled. It was the fastest UN treaty to ever be signed, and it comes into force on 30th September 2016. The Treaty lays out specific rules for accessible formats.

Natalie Smith (Associate, Harbottle & Lewis):

  • The data protection act was made in 1998, so needs updating in line with changes to the way businesses operate. The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into direct effect in the EU from 25 May 2018. It will result in big changes, and higher penalties for misuse of data.
  • Even if the UK leaves the EU, we will still need to comply and adjust to the GDPR standards, because they will have a new extra-territorial scope for those, from outside, who do business with the EU.

Andre Breedt (Director Book Research International, Nielsen Book):

  • New research from Nielsen shows that the most important element of successful book sales is uploading a cover image with your book data. 83.2% of books sold had a ‘full-set’ of metadata assigned to them.
  • Timing is also important for a successful book launch. It is advised by BIC that metadata is provided 16 weeks prior to a publication date.

Florin Craciun (Head of Sales, Ingenta):

  • Your backlist, is another publishers frontlist. In other words – a good place to look, when trying to increase revenues is monetization of the backlist.
  • Revenue from rights departments flows to the bottom line. Historically there has been minimal investment in the infrastructure of rights departments; and this too, can be an ideal place to focus for increased revenues.

Thanks to BIC for hosting such an interesting event!

 

 

 

Editorial & Sales Assistant [JOB POSTING]

Music Sales Group is one of the World’s leading music publishers, owning and managing over 200,000 popular and classical music copyrights. The Group is also Europe’s largest printed music publisher and distributes sheet music, books, instruments and accessories from the UK, Europe, US, Australia and Far East.  The UK Group both owns and operates a number of retail outlets along with offering a market leading online business – musicroom.com.

The Group is privately owned by one family over several generations.  The UK Head Office is situated in London, in the West End, where the Group Board resides and where the Editorial and Creative teams are located. The support functions (Purchasing, Sales, IT, Copyright accounting & Finance) together with a substantial worldwide distribution centre are located in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk.

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES: 

The Editorial & Sales Assistant supports the Managing Editor and Sales Manager in the provision of general editorial and sales support for Omnibus Press, so must have good writing and general editorial skills.  The recruitment process will include proof reading and writing tests.

Key Objectives:

1. Supporting with editorial work

2. Sales duties

3. Editorial & Sales support

TASKS & RESPONSIBILITIES: 

Editorial work

  • Straightforward proofing and editing
  • Collating page proofs, checking online printers’ proofs and liaising with the parties involved
  • Editorial work for Overlook Press editions
  • New project research where required
  • Sending out routine rejection letters
  • Liaising with freelancers where necessary

Sales Duties

  • Processing client and author purchase orders
  • Responding to publication enquiries (specifically product availability, price, discount, format and publication date)
  • Liaising with external agents (home and export) on sales opportunities ? Sourcing new leads and acquiring and updating our client information details
  • Collating data for sales presentations and AI sheets and assisting with sales reports
  • Organising meetings with clients and authors alike
  • Listing and amending Omnibus Press publication information on Nielsen Book Editor and other online platforms
  • Creating the annual Omnibus Press catalogue

Editorial and sales support

  • Fixing book fair appointments and other meetings (e.g. sales conferences, filming days)
  • Dealing with general enquiries
  • Ensuring Overlook Press are supplied with up-to-date information
  • Maintaining the Omnibus Press schedules under supervision
  • Collating information for a contracts database
  • Helping out at publicity events, Book Fairs
  • Ensuring information for translation rights sales is up-to-date
  • Collating editorial and sales materials for presentations, pitches, trade fairs etc
  • Routine author liaison to ensure we have up-to-date biographies, author photos, etc
  • Sending out complimentary copies and reviews and ordering up sample copies; ensuring we have a reference set of our own titles
  • Departmental filing
  • Providing holiday and sickness cover for the Editorial and Sales Managers

SKILLS & BEHAVIOURAL REQUIREMENTS: 

Experience

Minimum of a year’s experience within publishing, media or book trade is desired

Skills and Abilities

  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills
  • Strong attention to detail
  • Ambitious self-starter

Personal Qualities

  • A confident, outgoing team player who also has the ability and drive to work under minimal supervision
  • A keen interest in music and film
  • Confident and outgoing individual with adaptable people skills

Availability

Core working hours are 0930 to 1730 Monday to Friday, however you will need to be flexible and able to work additional hours as required ensuring deadlines are met.

Willing to travel to the Suffolk office and sales exhibitions from time to time, as required.

This is a role with huge variety and we require someone who is willing to do everything from making tea for guests to aiding us run sales campaigns and meeting with authors and packagers.

The role will offer great experience in almost every aspect of publishing.

Please send your CV and a covering letter, explaining why you think you would be suitable for the role, to careers@musicsales.co.uk no later than the closing date of Monday 5th September.

Alice Sutherland-Hawes works as assistant to Hilary Delamere at The Agency (London) Limited where she assists on a client list which includes Malorie Blackman and Michael Bond. She’s a Chatterbooks Ambassador and is working up a few of her own picture book ideas.

1) Be able to learn very quickly

My second week was Bologna Book Fair so my boss was away and for the most part, uncontactable. To say I was thrown in the deep end is quite an understatement! Being able to pick things up quickly is a huge advantage in this environment because there will be times when your boss isn’t around to go over something again with you and it’s essential that you know what you’re doing with contracts, invoices and royalty statements, as well as everything else!

2) A great knowledge of your agent’s taste in books

Quite often it’s the assistant who is one who reads submissions first. They have to get through you before their work is seen by the agent. This means you have to know what your agent is looking for, and what they do and don’t like. I know my boss doesn’t go for high fantasy and I know what sort of thing she’s looking for. I get around thirty submissions a week so it makes it far easier when I’m sifting through them to know what I’m looking for.

3) Lists

I mean, organisation goes without saying but lists are your best friend. It’s your job to know what the clients are doing, where they are in their schedules, whether invoices need to be sent and of course, your boss’s diary. So lists, lists, lists. I have my daily to-do list, my monthly to-do list for ongoing projects, a list of all our clients and what they’re up to and an outstanding invoices list, to name a few. It means whenever my boss asks me something I know exactly where to look for the answer and I know what all our clients are doing, how many projects they have and where their payments and contracts are.

4) The ability to work on your own

Working in an agency usually means you’re only working for one or two people. I work for one agent so when she’s busy or away, I’m on my own. You’ve got to be able to handle things and solve problems by yourself. Occasionally that means a stop-gap until your boss is available but there are times when it’s all down to you. Along with this you’ve got to be unflappable. When you’re scheduling Bologna and London meetings at the same time whilst preparing rights catalogues and portfolios, as well as doing everything else the job usually requires, things can feel quite manic. Keeping a cool head and being able to manage everything yourself is essential.

5) An unquenchable appetite for reading

This might seem obvious but I’m not sure it’s clear just how much reading is involved until you’re at the desk. To give you some idea, I read three full manuscripts last Thursday. This isn’t reading for pleasure – this is reading and reporting on manuscripts as well as going through the slush pile which can be…interesting. A lot of the time you’re reading outside of work as well so you really, really need to love reading, whatever the story is.

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