Companion publishing: How digital can complement print

Companion publishing: How digital can complement print

The beauty of the web is that feedback for what I write here is spread across a variety of platforms. These days it seems most of those community discussions are happening on LinkedIn and that’s where some recent comments helped me see the common thread across a few different topics I’ve been writing about. A […]

How readers will become curators and resellers [OPINION]

How readers will become curators and resellers [OPINION]

It’s easy to think that today’s ebook is as good as it gets. Publishers are mostly satisfied with the current print-under-glass model and, unfortunately, flattening (or declining) ebook sales trends aren’t likely to drive investment in digital innovation. What if readers could help drive some of that innovation in the future? Here’s why that’s a […]

Is the Colouring-In Book Craze a Finite Market?

Is the Colouring-In Book Craze a Finite Market?

In the past year the industry has seen a new craze for adult colouring-in books flourish around the world, crossing markets and continents, as stressed-out grown-ups turn to colouring books for peace of mind.

Content is no longer king. Here are 5 things that are.

Content is no longer king. Here are 5 things that are.

This is a guest post by Nick Robinson. Nick has worked in ELT publishing since 2004 and in 2012 he founded the world’s first ELT author representation agency. He is the Co-founder of the IATEFL Materials Writing Special Interest Group (MaWSIG) and ELTjam.

Frankfurt Survival Guide

Frankfurt Survival Guide

It’s that time of year again when the publishing world heads off to Frankfurt for a few days of meetings, parties and other shenanigans. The move to hall 6 this year is bound to throw some seasoned publishing-types off-balance, so we thought it was a good opportunity to ask some experts for their advice on how […]

Let’s make books live forever [OPINION]

Let’s make books live forever [OPINION]

This is a guest blog from Titash Neogi on why we should take responsibility for keeping books popular. Titash has 10 years of experience in equal mixes of technical product management, consumer-internet user-behaviour, code jockeying, user experience design and startup team building. He also developed BookMachine Connect.

The next 5 years of publishing: the future of reading and content consumption – part 1 [OPINION]

The next 5 years of publishing: the future of reading and content consumption – part 1 [OPINION]

In the run up to Publishing: the next 5 years, BookMachine will be featuring a number of opinions about what might be next for the industry. This is a guest blog from Titash Neogi. Titash has 10 years of experience in equal mixes of technical product management, consumer-internet user-behaviour, code jockeying, user experience design and […]

The next 5 years of publishing: jetpacks and hoverboards [OPINION]

The next 5 years of publishing: jetpacks and hoverboards [OPINION]

In the run up to Publishing: the next 5 years, BookMachine will be featuring a number of opinions about what might be next for the industry. This is a guest blog from Lottie Chase. Lottie is the Sales Manager of Legend Press, a publisher passionate about championing new and high-profile authors and ensuring the book […]

Malleable Models: The real effects of the digital revolution on business

Malleable Models: The real effects of the digital revolution on business

This is a guest post from Jasmin Kirkbride. Jasmin is a regular blogger for BookMachine and Editorial Assistant at Periscope Books (part of Garnet Publishing). She is also a published author and you can find her on Twitter @jasminkirkbride World-famous travel and maps bookshop Stanfords has announced that, alongside books, they will now be offering […]

Towing the Line: Banned books and YA fiction

Towing the Line: Banned books and YA fiction

The Office of Intellectual Freedom (OIF), an arm of the American Library Association (ALA), recently released the list of the most banned books in the US during 2014. It’s an annual report, but what’s surprising is that, year upon year, these lists increasingly contain YA and Children’s titles.