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SeeBook

Spanish start-up interview: SeeBook

SeeBook is a new publishing start-up that enables e-books to be sold in brick-and-mortar stores, given away as gifts or signed by the author. Rosa Sala co-founded the company after years of experiencing challenges within the publishing industry.

SeeBook are kindly sponsoring BookMachine Barcelona on Thursday. Maria Cardona interviewed Rosa to find out more.

Maria: What is SeeBook? Where did the idea come from, and what exactly do you offer?

Rosa: In a nutshell: SeeBooks are physical cards which allow you to download ebooks in multiple formats. They are sold in bookshops.

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How to set up a publishing house

How to set up a publishing house: Red Button Publishing

Caroline Goldsmith and Karen Ings founded Red Button Publishing in 2012. Like many professionals working with books, the idea of running their own publishing house had always appealed to them. Red Button published their fourth novel last summer. We wanted to find out some of the challenges and lessons learned from starting up from scratch, so here’s our interview with Caroline.

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brand

The End of the Indie Gold Rush?

This is a guest post from Ricardo Fayet. Ricardo is an avid reader and startup enthusiast who has been studying the publishing industry with interest for several years. He co-founded Reedsy, to help authors collaborate with publishing professionals.

An  ALCS survey in the UK last summer crystalised industry concerns about whether career authorship is a viable profession these days. The report painted a somewhat grim picture for professional and part-time authors alike–regardless of whether those authors publish traditionally or independently. (For a crash-course on the industry landscape, I recommend Kristine Kathryn Rush’s exhaustive report on “things indies learned in 2014”.)

The question now is, has the inde “Gold Rush” passed? Is success finite, and has it been mined to depletion?

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5 Questions for Jake McGraw from Refinery29 [INTERVIEW]

Host of November’s BookMachine NYC, Bree Weber, talks to speaker on the night Jake McGraw, Director of Operations at Refinery29.

Grab your tickets for BookMachine NYC here.

1. Can you give us a bit of background – who are you and how you came to join the R29 family?

After receiving my computer science degree in 2006, I was attracted to the world of internet-based startups to have an outsized impact in a small company. I have worked as a full-stack software engineer for a variety (from 2 to 200 employees) of New York based companies across many different business verticals. In 2013, I transitioned to management; I now direct multiple teams, focusing on technology strategy and defensibility.

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5 Questions for Miral Sattar from Bibliocrunch [INTERVIEW]

Host of November’s BookMachine NYC, Bree Weber, talks to speaker on the night Miral Sattar, founder of BiblioCrunch.

Grab your tickets for BookMachine NYC here.

1. What’s your background and how did you get involved in the publishing industry?
I’m an engineer by background, love to write and publish, and also love help other people publish. So, obviously, a natural fit for me would be to combine all three into my own company.

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5 questions for Joe Regal from Zola Books [INTERVIEW]

Host of November’s BookMachine NYC, Bree Weber, talks to speaker on the night Joe Regal, co-founder of Zola Books.

Grab your tickets for BookMachine NYC here.

1. How did your background as a literary agent lead to Zola Books?

What I saw as an agent was that with the rise of digital books, authors were stuck with a royalty rate I didn’t feel was fair – 25% of net – but the problem came not from publishers as much as a retail environment where publishers were being squeezed by an increasingly small group of increasingly powerful retailers, and the publishers were passing on that pain to the writers out of self-preservation.  It seemed really clear that in order to continue to serve writers, I needed to become involved in an effort to bring more diversity to retail, so that publishers would have more outlets for their books, enabling them to continue to nurture writers struggling to start careers…or struggling to maintain careers.

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Independent Publishing: Scottish Literature and the Referendum [ESSAY]

In this essay, BookMachine contributor, Glasgow native and holder of two hitherto useless degrees in Scottish Literature Chris Ward attempts to explain some of the factors behind the overwhelmingly positive show of support for independence from the Scottish literary community.

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6 Questions for Eric Huang [INTERVIEW]

Eric HuangEric Huang is Development Director at Made in Me, an award winning digital agency specialising in children’s entertainment and brand development.

He’ll be our key speaker at BookMachine London, on September 25th, so we wanted to find a little bit more about what he has been up to.

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5 Questions for Jamie McGarry of Valley Press [INTERVIEW]

Jamie_in_the_frame__cropped___edited_Earlier this year, Valley Press published an anthology of short stories by writers under 25 featuring yours truly called Front Lines (here’s a review and here’s a buy link, if you should so care), which is how I met Jamie McGarry. I’ve had a soft spot for small independent presses since working at Voiceworks when I was in university – they take risks on new and exciting writers in a ways which larger publishing houses may not (eg: anthologies of short stories and poetry) and are, from my point of view, an incredibly important part of our publishing landscape. With this in mind, I thought it would be a good idea to interview Jamie about what it’s like running an independent press in this day and age.

Jamie McGarry was born in Norfolk, raised in North Wales, and has lived in Scarborough, North Yorkshire, since 2006.  He likes to think of himself as a ‘creative entrepeneur’, and is currently proving it by running a small publishing house called Valley Press. Visit VP at www.valleypressuk.com, or find tweets @valleypress.

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Fifty Shades of Backlist Fiction

Judith SummersThis is a guest post from author Judith Summers, who is currently storming the Kindle charts with her book Dear Sister.

I’ve been a No.5  bestseller in the past, I’ve  been a No.4 bestseller – but it’s taken thirty years of being an author, ten published books and the advent of Kindle  for me to hit  the No.1  spot . Now I’ve finally scored – and with my  first published novel.

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9 questions for Dean Johnson [INTERVIEW]

Dean Johnson

In the run up to BookMachine Unplugged we interviewed Dean Johnson of Brandwidth. Dean will be talking at Unplugged about Brandwidth’s latest project The Numinous Place  – an example of multiple partners working together to produce a new fictional experience for readers.

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(Another) Spotify For Books

Here’s how to alienate a large portion of possible content sources in one go: compare your product to their greatest fear. Perhaps Oyster didn’t call themselves the ‘Spotify for books’ in their pitch to publishers – I wasn’t at Frankfurt – but it’s certainly how they’ve been branded in the aftermath. And it doesn’t, as far as I can see, do them any favours.

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5 top publishing partnerships and collaborations

In the run up to the launch of BookMachine.me I’ve picked out some of the top publishing partnerships and collaborations around. I hope it gives you some inspiration to get out there and start collaborating! … and also to come to the launch of BookMachine.me at BookMachine Unplugged on 7th November.

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5 questions for Sarah Benton of Hot Key Books [INTERVIEW]

Sarah BentonIn the last 12 months Bonnier’s newest enterprise, Hot Key Books, has gone from boardroom idea to fully fledged business, currently supporting 17 people and a list of 9 excellent children’s titles in the first year alone.
 
With an ambitious target of 30 – 50 titles to take to market in the second year, Sales and Marketing Manager, Sarah Benton, talks about how it feels to be part of the team leading the charge into the rapidly evolving future of successful Children’s books.

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Kickstarter: publishing so indie it hurts (in a good way).

Did you ever have a super-indie friend when you were younger? The kind who would have a party catered by his friend who owned a microbrewery and his other mate who was a DJ, and there wouldn’t be room to park your bike next to the warehouse and when you went inside your friend would kiss you on both cheeks and give you a beer in a jar with the label on because it was not only environmentally-friendly but also re-appropriating some mass-market iconography, and you’d find yourself drawn into a conversation about Berlin even though no-one had ever been, and then your friend would ask you what you thought of his art and you’d say it’s fantastic and he’d say ‘really?’ and you’d say ‘of course!’ and then you’d notice the warehouse was decked out with his photography and they all had price tags on them and you’d walk away £200 lighter carrying three black-and-white photos of lamp-posts?

Well, that friend can pack away his tiny kegs and price tag stickers, because the internet has spawned a new way to be totally indie and totally cashed up at the same time. Kickstarter.

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