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Frankfurt Survival Guide

It’s that time of year again when the publishing world heads off to Frankfurt for a few days of meetings, parties and other shenanigans. The move to hall 6 this year is bound to throw some seasoned publishing-types off-balance, so we thought it was a good opportunity to ask some experts for their advice on how to negotiate the rest. Don’t forget to drink plenty of water, or not ….

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Samantha Missingham

Working in Publishing and Marketing: Samantha Missingham interview

Samantha Missingham is Head of Audience Development at Harper Collins Publishers. Here Stephanie Cox interviews Sam about her career so far, the impact of social media on publishing, and the various roles she has held.

1. Can you give my readers a brief overview of your career so far?

Sure. I’ve spent the vast amount of my career working in magazine publishing. I started at a very small company that published financial technology titles. I learned a huge amount working in a small business with a very entrepreneurial boss. He taught me a few simple but important things – everyone in the company should be able to answer the phone & give a decent answer to any question about the business, also, pretty much every call coming into a business is a sales opportunity – if you understand everything that you sell. I then worked at Centaur on many of their B2B magazines, including Marketing Week, Creative Review and New Media Age. I launched their community site MAD.co.uk (for marketing, advertising & design professionals). This is where I learned about building audiences/communities and the various ways you can get people to pay for content. And yes I was MAD Marketing Manager for a while 😉

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5 Questions for Sam Missingham, Head of Events at HarperCollins

 
Sam Missingham
Sam Missingham
Sam Missingham is Head of Events at HarperCollins. She organised the Romance Festival, which was the first publisher-agnostic virtual event organised by a publisher. She is kindly presenting it as a case study at BookMachine London on 22nd July. We wanted to find out a little bit more before the event. 1) What initially sparked the idea to host the Romance Festival as a virtual event? Talking to the editorial team from HarperImpulse and Avon – they told me that romance authors and readers were very digitally engaged – which got me thinking as to how we could connect with them and add value to the conversation. 2) Do you think we’ll be seeing many more virtual events over the next few years? Certainly from HarperCollins, I’m hoping to run similar publisher-agnostic events in crime, fantasy, teen and possibly some other areas too. The Romance Festival showed that if you focus on what readers and authors would like out of an event, delivering a virtual festival with these elements is a fairly easy way to connect, engage and add value. 3) How could the book industry and rights networks adapt to, use and benefit from virtual events? I’m sure more of our interactions and deals could be done using online platforms like Google Hangouts. As an industry, I’m not sure we are maximising the potential offered by these free communication channels. But, I’m also a great believer in touching the flesh, so long live Frankfurt and London Book fair as far as I’m concerned. 4) What is next for the events team at HarperCollins? I’m organising an event with George RR Martin and Robin Hobb. To say it’s an exciting event to work on is an understatement. 5) Finally, could we please have a sneak peek of what you’re going to talk about at BookMachine? I’m going to talk about the Romance Festival as a case study, so what our objectives were, how we went about it, things we learned and then results. Very happy to be very open and answer any questions along the way. Eventbrite - BookMachine London with Sam Missingham of HarperCollins Publishers Eventbrite - #BookMachine Booksylibros

#BookMachine Booksylibros – ‘Will we all be meeting face-to-face in 10 years time?’

What do you think? Join us on 9th July from 11am GMT to discuss online during #BookMachine Booksylibros. Sign up here.  
Maria Cardona
Maria Cardona
“Even though we communicate through email nowadays, the fact that book fairs and events are all year round shows us just how important it still is to meet face-to-face. I believe that even in an online era in the future, when we are even more engaged in a digital way of life – that real events, and gatherings, will gain more power and meaning than ever.”
Maria Cardona Serra, Agent, Pontas Literary & Film Agency
   
Sam Missingham
Sam Missingham
I genuinely hope so. With so many online communication channels available, I think we should be using them all more often, certainly. They offer untold opportunities for engaging with our many different audiences. However, I am also a huge fan of meeting people in real life. The book industry is full of fabulous people who are mostly very sociable. Nothing can recreate real interaction and the odd glass of wine.”
Sam Missingham, Head of Events, Harper Collins
   
Tom Chalmers
Tom Chalmers
“Books have a subjective value and so require conversation and this will always work well face-to-face – which is why the industry is seen as a personal one – therefore there will always be a place for face-to-face meetings. However, this is no longer restricted to those with the time and financial resources to attend book fairs etc around the world and business no longer needs to be restricted to when those events happen – online platforms completely open up the market for business to be completed. Therefore, online platforms will provide the main current of business with face-to-face events operating on a smaller scale providing centres for closing business.”
Tom Chalmers, Managing Director, IPR License   What do you think? Join us on 9th July from 11am GMT to discuss online during #BookMachine Booksylibros. Sign up here.

New BookMachine London publishing event

London Publishing EventNot long to go until our face-to-face meetings at London publishing events are replaced by virtual meet-ups. Where the familiarity of shaking someone’s hand is replaced by the opening of a Webcam. This idea is just evolving. In June 2014, HarperCollins hosted its first ever virtual Romance Festival. If you were lucky enough to take part you’ll know that it was attended by several of the biggest authors in the world, as well as a number of industry experts. Sam Missingham, Head of Events at HarperCollins, who organised the festival is kindly presenting it as a case study at a new London Publishing Event – BookMachine London on 22nd July. It was the first publisher-agnostic virtual event organised by a publisher ever, and we are chuffed that Sam will be joining us to present and answer questions about the London Publishing event.
We would really like to thank Inspired Selection for sponsoring this event. Inspired Selection is a specialist recruitment consultancy dedicated to serving the publishing industry, across all markets, both in traditional print and digital media. The Inspired Selection team will also be attending BookMachine London on 22nd July.  

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