• Home
  • Thomas Pynchon

Tag: Thomas Pynchon

Pynchon leads National Book Award shortlists

If all the superlatives thrown at Eleanor Catton’s Booker win (longest book ever to win, youngest author ever to win), the universal warm fuzzy feelings engendered by Alice Munro’s Nobel win and the obligatory contrarian repudiation of at least one of those by Bret Easton Ellis weren’t enough to tip you off, we are firmly into end-of-year awards season, which continues apace with the announcement of this year’s National Book Awards shortlist. The annual awards, presented by the American non-profit National Book Foundation, consider nominees in fiction, non-fiction, poetry and young people’s literature, and this year sees some particularly well-known candidates.

Continue reading

Joanna Newsom joins Paul Thomas Anderson’s Pynchon adaptation

In adaptation news I really thought we’d covered already, Paul Thomas Anderson – writer/director of The Master, There Will Be Blood and Boogie Nights and, to this writer at least, the best American filmmaker of his generation – is currently at work on a big-screen version of Thomas Pynchon’s most recent novel, 2009’s Inherent Vice. (Strictly speaking, it’s Anderson’s second time adapting someone else’s work, although he kept so little of Upton Sinclair’s Oil! for There Will Be Blood that it almost seems misleading to call that film an adaptation.)

As if the prospect of Anderson adapting Pynchon weren’t exciting enough – the first time any work of Pynchon’s has been adapted for the cinema, incidentally – the director has been assembling a fairly jaw-dropping cast for the project: Joining Anderson’s Master lead Joaquin Phoenix as Pynchon’s protagonist, stoner detective Larry “Doc” Sportello, are Josh Brolin, Reese Witherspoon, Owen Wilson, Benicio Del Toro, Jena Malone, Martin Short, Maya Rudolph, Jeannie Berlin, fellow Anderson regular Kevin J. O’Connor and, if persistent rumours are to be believed, Sean Penn. Now that cast has had another intriguing addition revealed: Widely adored singer-songwriter Joanna Newsom, making her own cinematic debut following cameo appearances in TV sketch show Portlandia and the video for MGMT’s “Kids”.

Continue reading

New Thomas Pynchon book exists, and that’s it for now

Yeah, so the apocalypse didn’t happen after all and we’re back for 2013, and hello again, and [SEASONAL PLEASANTRY NOT FOUND]. In even more Earth-shaking news than the Mayans anticipated, however, the end of 2012 has brought with it word of an occurrence almost as rare as a planet-destroying cataclysm: A new novel from Thomas Pynchon, the iconic, near-mythic American author whose output over the past fifty years has, until now, averaged slightly fewer than one and a half novels per decade, publishing seven in total since 1963. (If you’re keeping track, that means that he’s averaged more guest appearances on The Simpsons over the past decade than he has published novels per decade over his entire career.)

Continue reading

BookMachine Weekly BookWrap: publishing stories from around the web

This week on the site, our Monday column argued that sometimes Your Innovation Ain’t All That. We then saw The elderly get techy with iPads, and Thomas Pynchon’s back catalogue digitised at last, while dreaming up puns as Publishing goes to the dogs in early Christmas slate announcements (barking up the wrong tree?).

Our big news was the announcement of BookMachine Oxford (hosted by Osprey Group). We hope to see all you Oxford folks there on 28th June.

Elsewhere on the web, there’s lots going on for you self-publishing types out there: are you Not writing? There’s an app for that: Write or Die. There’s More on the economics of the self-published book, some reading on Booktango and the Future of DIY E-book Publishing and there’s the suggestion that Amazon’s markup of digital delivery to indie authors is ~129,000%.

Are you an editor? This week The Guardian has been big on The importance of good editing, and what do you think, Should Editors Get Credited in Books?

Meanwhile, here’s Jane Friedman on marketing and building an author platform and the Anatomy of Book Discovery: A Case Study.

These posts look at How ‘Fifty Shades’ Is Changing the Face of Publishing and Why the ebook you want isn’t for sale in your country.

And, to wrap up this week, here’s a Summer Reading List 2012: 10 Essential Books for Cognitive Sunshine.

Gravity’s Kindle: Thomas Pynchon’s back catalogue digitised at last

In what hopefully isn’t a portent of his impending death, Thomas Pynchon has joined the likes of Ray Bradbury in finally consenting to have his works made (legally) available as e-books after long refusing to authorise such a move. The legendary American author of Gravity’s Rainbow, The Crying of Lot 49 and Mason & Dixon will see his seven novels (the aforementioned three, as well as V., Vineland, Against The Day and Inherent Vice) and one book of short stories, Slow Learner, available in digital format from today, his publisher, Penguin Press, has told the New York Times.

Continue reading

Get the latest news and event info straight to your inbox

Account


+44 207 183 2399

Incubation at Ravensbourne | 6 Penrose Way | Greenwich Peninsula | SE10 0EW

© 2019 BookMachine We love your books