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Belle and Sebastian co-founder Stuart David writing YA novels

It takes a lot of effort to be a die-hard Belle and Sebastian fan, what with all the myriad side projects and new endeavours undertaken by band members past and present: soundtracks to imaginary musicals followed five years later by an actual musical, tour diaries, collaborations with beings of pure gravel, excellently titled solo albums, stage shows, not to mention the assorted LPs, EPs and singles that make up the band’s core discography. Now, add a couple more items to the pile for completists: founding member Stuart David is set to release two YA novels.

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Let the YouGov profiler do your market research for you

If you’ve been on Twitter at any point since the weekend, chances are that you’ve come across the YouGov profiler, a jolly little plaything/terrifying cross-section of all the privacies we wilfully surrender that allows users to input the name of ‘any brand, person or thing’ then presents them with a picture of a typical fan of said brand, person or thing courtesy of the titular market research firm. It’s by no means exhaustive (apparently there weren’t enough fans of Yo La Tengo to constitute an appropriate sample size, which is of course just how Yo La Tengo fans like it) but it’s certainly an enjoyable way to pass a few minutes confirming your existing prejudices engaging in some low-level market research. With the profiler’s help, then, BookMachine proudly (?) presents a guide to the demographics you need to pitch to if you want to make it big in publishing [puts feet up on desk, taps out cigar ash].

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Self-publishing

FACT: Self-publishing is not all about fiction

This is a guest post from the team at CompletelyNovel, sponsors of BookMachine Brighton (photos here).

There has been a lot of media attention on self-published fiction titles that have gone on to success. Hugh Howey, E. L. James and Bella Andre – to name a few – have all proven that self-publishing is a viable way to reach readers. At CompletelyNovel.com we saw an initial wave of customers focused on fiction (largely, I imagine, due to our name!) but it’s interesting how your customers can start using your service in ways you didn’t necessarily expect.

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Tahira Rahemtulla

An exciting contest for writers [INTERVIEW]

This is an interview with Tahira Rahemtulla, a senior editor at Unambiguous Edit. Tahira is hosting a writing contest, That’s Write!, as a lead of Unambiguous Edit, in collaboration with TLAC Printing and Publishing, BookMachine, and Wildfire Studio.

1. Tell us a little bit about Unambiguous Edit. Is it a book editing company?

Unambiguous Edit is an online editing service; we used to focus just on books, but our clients were so pleased with the quality of edits and service, we had a lot of demand for other editing services. So now we offer editing for all documents.

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rebecca-swift

From scarcity to ubiquity: digitisation in photography

This is a guest post from Rebecca Swift, Director of Creative Planning at iStock (speaker at BookMachine London this Thursday)

Last year Facebook revealed that users uploaded 350 million images every day. The 2014 Internet Trends report from analyst Mary Meeker published in May states that internet users are sharing 1.8 billion images every day (thanks to the visually based apps such as Instagram, Snapchat and WhatsApp as well as Facebook.)

These numbers were unfathomable even 5 years ago and it was only 15 years ago that digitization of imagery was really starting to take off.

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Working in Publishing

Three things I learned that made working in publishing bearable

This is a guest post from Carl Pappenheim, owner of Spineless Classics about Working in Publishing (sponsor of BookMachine Oxford on November 6).

Publishing is comfortably the most glamorous and educational industry going (well, after tech support of course) but working with text can be a trial.  Whether it’s a poorly formatted lengthy terms-of-business from a bureaucratic behemoth who want to give you a license, or just a poorly transcribed manuscript that was typed up by somebody’s myopic aunty on a Wordstar electric typewriter, at some point you’re going to be tearing at your elegantly coiffed hair with frustration at all the time you’re wasting filling in missing full-stops instead of getting into an event early enough to complain about the free wine.  I personally find such misuses of my time very trying, so in a generous attempt to lessen the misery for others I present to you three things that have greatly reduced my stress of working in publishing over the past few years.

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Chris

3 lessons writers can learn from the music industry

This is a guest blog from Christopher Russell, author of Mockstars, a music novel inspired by his international tour diaries for rock/pop band The Lightyears.

As someone who has spent over a decade in the trenches of the music industry, when I migrated into the book world last year I was delighted to find that everyone in publishing is spectacularly nice to one another. By contrast, rock ’n’ roll is rather less cuddly – and in fact it’s largely for this reason that I think it has prepared me well for life as an aspiring writer.

With this in mind, here are a few of the transferable lessons:

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Toby Hopkins

Social Media at Getty Images

This is a guest post from Toby Hopkins, Senior Account Manager at Getty Images (sponsor of next month’s BookMachine London).

“Does Getty Images have a social media strategy?” Sam Missingham asked me after one of her tour de force appearances at BookMachine or a similar event.   Myself being new to Getty Images at the time, I couldn’t answer. So I talked to a woman who could. Jen Stanley, based in London, is a member of the global Getty Images social media team.

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Tom Chalmers

Finding gold in the backlist

Many will know I have an unashamed love for Haruki Murakami. So when I heard that his debut work, which is almost impossible to find in English, will be translated and re-released next year my heart missed a beat.

Hear the Wind Sing was first published in Japanese in 1979 and released in English eight years later, translated by Alfred Birnbaum. It is no longer in print, and copies of the novella are said to be changing hands for huge sums online.

Of course the Murakami phenomenon is in itself a pretty rare thing in the publishing world. A writer who has become an actual celebrity in their own right is neigh on a miracle these days, forgive me J.K., especially when you see bestseller lists dominated by ‘celebrities’ turned ‘writers’ week after week.

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