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Belle and Sebastian co-founder Stuart David writing YA novels

It takes a lot of effort to be a die-hard Belle and Sebastian fan, what with all the myriad side projects and new endeavours undertaken by band members past and present: soundtracks to imaginary musicals followed five years later by an actual musical, tour diaries, collaborations with beings of pure gravel, excellently titled solo albums, stage shows, not to mention the assorted LPs, EPs and singles that make up the band’s core discography. Now, add a couple more items to the pile for completists: founding member Stuart David is set to release two YA novels.

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Tahira Rahemtulla

An exciting contest for writers [INTERVIEW]

This is an interview with Tahira Rahemtulla, a senior editor at Unambiguous Edit. Tahira is hosting a writing contest, That’s Write!, as a lead of Unambiguous Edit, in collaboration with TLAC Printing and Publishing, BookMachine, and Wildfire Studio.

1. Tell us a little bit about Unambiguous Edit. Is it a book editing company?

Unambiguous Edit is an online editing service; we used to focus just on books, but our clients were so pleased with the quality of edits and service, we had a lot of demand for other editing services. So now we offer editing for all documents.

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Sue

Creative Entrepreneurship in Oxford [COURSE]

In January 2014, sixteen publishers joined the ‘Publishing Fusion Workshop’ in Oxford. They had understood that to futureproof a career in publishing these days requires a multitude of skills: digital, creative and entrepreneurial. After three days of lectures and seminars by tutors from the Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies together with some of the most innovative and inspirational professionals in the industry, almost all the participants said the course was the most exciting they had ever been on. More significantly, having been divided into groups to work on born digital projects, the outputs were so stunning that one project resulted in a contract from RandomHouse!

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Let the YouGov profiler do your market research for you

If you’ve been on Twitter at any point since the weekend, chances are that you’ve come across the YouGov profiler, a jolly little plaything/terrifying cross-section of all the privacies we wilfully surrender that allows users to input the name of ‘any brand, person or thing’ then presents them with a picture of a typical fan of said brand, person or thing courtesy of the titular market research firm. It’s by no means exhaustive (apparently there weren’t enough fans of Yo La Tengo to constitute an appropriate sample size, which is of course just how Yo La Tengo fans like it) but it’s certainly an enjoyable way to pass a few minutes confirming your existing prejudices engaging in some low-level market research. With the profiler’s help, then, BookMachine proudly (?) presents a guide to the demographics you need to pitch to if you want to make it big in publishing [puts feet up on desk, taps out cigar ash].

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Self-publishing

FACT: Self-publishing is not all about fiction

This is a guest post from the team at CompletelyNovel, sponsors of BookMachine Brighton (photos here).

There has been a lot of media attention on self-published fiction titles that have gone on to success. Hugh Howey, E. L. James and Bella Andre – to name a few – have all proven that self-publishing is a viable way to reach readers. At CompletelyNovel.com we saw an initial wave of customers focused on fiction (largely, I imagine, due to our name!) but it’s interesting how your customers can start using your service in ways you didn’t necessarily expect.

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Saltire Book of the Year announced

The Saltire Literary Awards – which recognise the best Scottish books of the year across literature, history, research and poetry, as well as debuting authors and accomplishments in publishing – have named Bob Harris and Charles McKean’s The Scottish Town in the Age of Enlightenment 1740-1820 as their overall book of the year. The Saltire Society draws the Scottish Book of the Year winner from the victors in the aforementioned categories – Harris and McKean also won the Research Book of the Year award.

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The Hunger Games coming to the stage because sure, why not

It’s already been a successful trilogy of books, a successful quartet of films and may yet be a theme park, so it is with a certain weary inevitability that word comes of Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games making the transition to the London stage. The production continues the grand book -> film -> stage show tradition of The Phantom of the Opera, but with notably fewer musical numbers (although there’s obviously still time to fix that) and a chandelier being dropped not by a ghoulish denizen of the Parisian underworld but by a child with the express purpose of killing another child for the entertainment of adults, probably.

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Netflix to produce Lemony Snicket series

Lemony Snicket’s popular series of macabre books for young people, A Series of Unfortunate Events, has already seen at least some of its titles adapted into a film (which, if not great, is at least a significant step up from most of Jim Carrey’s other raids on the canon of children’s literature). Whilst said film didn’t quite prove a big enough hit to warrant adaptations of further titles in the series, a decade later Snicket’s work has found a home perhaps better suited to its episodic nature: Netflix.

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