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BookMachine NYC is back

With August at a close and summer hours about to expire we thought you could use some upbeat news. We’re thrilled to announce the hiatus is over: BookMachine NYC will be back in action this fall! Mark your calendars for Thursday, November 13, and keep an eye out for RSVP links with further details.

I think we can all agree we’ve had an interesting summer. Though we expected horrendously hot and humid weather, we’ve been met with mild heat and stormy rains. We also expected the season to bring slow work days and news lulls, but instead have opened our papers and screens to sensational publishing stories.

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Study publishing at City University, London

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This is a guest post from Mary Ann Kernan of City University, London. Interested in exploring a Publishing MA and UK/EU postgrad fee bursaries? Sign up for City’s Postgraduate Open Evening for 2014-15, 5-7pm on 10 September.

 

It’s great to be working with BookMachine this year to spread the word about City’s two top-rated Publishing MAs in 2014-15 (thanks, Laura & Gavin!). We’ve done a lot together since 2010, when City’s students ran a conference and networking event with BookMachine. Since then, our alums have interned with them, organised BookMachine events (keep an eye out for Tahira’s in Toronto?) and blogged (I especially enjoyed Emma Smith’s recent blog about Faber Factory). I also hosted a joint NY event with BookMachine in 2013, and enjoyed meeting some of the publishing community there; and we were one of the 2014 BookMachine event sponsors in London. (Time to plan for 2014-15, Bookmachiners?!)

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Amazon goes IRL with campus pick-up points

Of all the threats Amazon has posed to brick and mortar bookshops to date, real-world competition – that is, a branch of Amazon that book buyers can actually walk into – has been fairly low on the radar. Whilst an Amazon shop that allows customers to browse its lovingly-curated shelves physically still seems improbable, there is nevertheless bound to be a lot of nervous collar tugging in bookshops around the world at the news that the übercorporation is manifesting itself in an offline form on the campus of Indiana’s Purdue University as of next year.

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Authorised book to mark Nick Drake’s 40th anniversary

25 November this year marks 40 years since the death of singer-songwriter Nick Drake, aged 26, from an overdose of antidepressants, the intentionality of which has never been ascertained. Of the three albums of alternately lush and brittle songs he left behind – 1969’s Five Leaves Left, 1970’s Bryter Layter and 1972’s Pink Moon – the latter two each sold fewer than 5,000 copies during his lifetime. Drake’s critical and commercial cachet has risen significantly since his death, and in recognition of his 40th anniversary his estate has authorised for the first time a book on Drake’s life.

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Shortlist announced for Deanston Scottish Crime Book of the Year

Crime writing festival Bloody Scotland has revealed the shortlist for its Deanston Scottish Crime Book of the Year, whose winner will be announced as part of this year’s festival in September. The nominees are an even split between three genre veterans – Chris Brookmyre’s Flesh Wounds (Little, Brown), Louise Welsh’s A Lovely Way to Burn (Hodder & Stoughton), Peter May’s Entry Island (Quercus) – and books by three debuting authors: Nicola White’s In the Rosary Garden (Cargo), Neil Broadfoot’s Falling Fast (Saraband) and Natalie Haynes’ The Amber Fury (Corvus). The winner will take home £1,000 and be promoted in Waterstones branches across the country.

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Barnes & Noble teams with Samsung for new Nook tablet

Earlier in the summer Barnes & Noble announced that its oft-troubled Nook division was to partner with Samsung to release a line of tablets carrying Nook software. Now, the first fruit of that partnership has seen release in the form of the Galaxy Tab 4 Nook, a rebranded version of one of Samsung’s entry-level tablets, the Galaxy Tab 4. Currently only available in the USA, it’s priced at $179 with a seven inch, 1280 x 800 display, and is set apart from the previous model by the $200 worth of Nook-compatible books, magazines and TV shows with which it is pre-loaded. It is the first new Nook tablet since Barnes & Noble revealed last year that it would cease exclusive production of new tablets and instead move to a partnership model.

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2014 Hugo Awards presented to Ann Leckie, Tor.com

This year’s Hugo Awards – the annual prizes recognising achievement in science fiction and fantasy – were presented last night at Loncon 3, the 72nd World Science Fiction Convention in London’s ExCel, with a majority of the categories focusing on the genres’ literary representation. The ceremony’s headline award – Best Novel – went to Ann Leckie for her debut, Ancillary Justice, the first book in a planned space opera trilogy published by Orbit.

It was a big night for Tor.com, the online sci-fi magazine and imprint of Tor Books, which laid claim to three winners: Charles Stross’ “Equoid”, Mary Robinette Kowal’s “The Lady Astronaut of Mars” and John Chu’s “The Water That Falls on You from Nowhere” were named respectively Best Novella, Best Novelette and Best Short Story.

Doing almost as well was Aidan Moher’s sci-fi and fantasy blog A Dribble of Ink, which took two awards: Best Fanzine and Best Related Work for Kameron Hurley’s essay “We Have Always Fought: Challenging the Women, Cattle and Slaves Narrative”. Hurley also won Best Fan Writer.

Best Graphic Story went to Randall Munro for “Time”, a particularly innovative instalment of his long-running webcomic xkcd. Ellen Datlow and Ginjer Buchanan were named Best Editor for, respectively, short-form and long-form work. Lightspeed Magazine won Best Semiprozine.

Away from literary matters, Alfonso Cuarón’s Gravity took Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form, whilst the Short Form prize in the same category went to the Game of Thrones episode “The Rains of Castamere”. Julie Dillon was named Best Professional Artist, Sarah Webb Best Fan Artist and Best Fancast was presented to Patrick Hester’s Sf Signal Podcast.

The ceremony also saw the presentation of a non-Hugo award – the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, sponsored by Dell Magazines and given to the best new professional science fiction or fantasy writer of 2012 or 2013 – to Sofia Samatar, author of A Stranger in Olondria.

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Vintage giving away free James Bond books at lunchtime

Today in news so time-contingent you probably can’t even spare the couple of minutes it takes to read this: if you can get to the recently-installed James Bond BookBench in London’s Bloomsbury Square between 12pm and 2pm tomorrow (12/08), you might walk away with a free copy of one of Ian Fleming’s Bond novels courtesy of publisher Vintage. The company, in conjunction with Ian Fleming Publications and BookBench masterminds Books About Town, is marking the 50th anniversary of Fleming’s death with the promotion, with 200 copies of Moonraker, For Your Eyes Only, Thunderball, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service and the non-fiction collection Thrilling Cities set to be distributed to passers-by over the course of two hours.

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Open submission launches HarperCollins digital crime imprint

HarperCollins is extending its Killer Reads web presence – a promotional tool and online community for its crime titles since 2009 – into a digital-first crime and thriller imprint, and the publisher has revealed that it will launch the list with titles discovered via open submission. For one week only between 29 August and 4 September, the label will accept all the manuscripts the crime writers of the world can throw at it regardless of whether or not they have agents. After its launch Killer Reads hopes to put out one or two digital titles a month, so the search for new authors is presumably a method of shoring up its backlog in order to sustain that model. It follows a similar move from HarperCollins’ speculative fiction imprint, Harper Voyager, in 2012.

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Nielsen reveals further decline in print and books as gifts, rise in digital

We already know that print sales declined in 2013 (as they have year on year for a while now), dropping in value from £1.514 billion in 2012 to £1.416 billion – a slump of £98 million, 6.5% of total print sales in 2012. We also know that the decline in print books sold year on year was even more precipitous, dropping 9.8% from around 203.9 million units sold in 2012 to 183.9 million. Now Nielsen has released the results of its Book Survey analysing the damage in more detail, showing an overall decline of 4% in UK book sales across print and digital and pointing out one major contributing factor in particular – a fall in the number of books bought as gifts.

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