Win a pair of tickets for BookMachine Unplugged on 23rd May [COMPETITION]

BookMachine Unplugged is back in London on 23rd May. 4 speakers sharing their publishing experiences and an awesome crowd of publishing professionals – it’s an evening not to be missed! You can check out the photos from the last Unplugged event here.

As we prepare the finishing touches to the line-up and the event website, we wanted to give you the opportunity to get your name on the list early, whilst being in for a chance of winning a pair of free tickets.

It’s quick and easy to enter – just tell us the most interesting word you can think of.

We’ll pick the winner next Tuesday 16th April, as we announce the speakers and the host and unveil the new site. We’ll also aim to use the winning word more in conversation!

Are you ready to win?

 

Thanks in advance to our event sponsors The Society for Editors and Proofreaders (SfEP), Bookswarm, Createselect and Spineless Classics

 
T&Cs
One entry per person
The winner will be selected on 16th April and notified the same day
All entries will be added to our mailing list which keeps you posted on publishing happenings and BookMachine events

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Gender has no place in media coverage of book awards

The shortlist for one of the most coveted awards in science fiction was announced last week – the Arthur C. Clarke award for 2013 has an incredible line up of SF names, or, if you read The Guardian, is a great testament to male domination of the science fiction genre. Alison Flood’s opening sentence ‘reinforcing science fiction’s image as a boys club’ (sorry Angela Carter, Mira Grant, Connie Wilis, Margaret Atwood – seems your memberships are perhaps not as authentic as we all believed), leaves us little doubt that the following coverage will be everything other than informative.

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Reasons to celebrate Iain Banks while we have the chance

Yesterday’s shattering news that Iain Banks has terminal cancer and, at this point, is expected to live for less than a year is difficult to write about for many reasons, not least of which is resisting the temptation to turn in some sort of living eulogy. The widely beloved author of, amongst many others, The Crow Road, The Wasp Factory, The Bridge and Complicity, and, as Iain M. Banks, the Culture series of science fiction novels, would also surely abhor any notion of soliciting prayers, or ‘sending positive thoughts’, or being subject to maudlin rending of garments, or any such thing. What follows, then, is a few muddled, scattered, still reeling reasons, from a fan, why we should put such thoughts aside and celebrate Banks while we still have him amongst us:

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Seanan McGuire breaks records with Hugo nominations

The nominees for this year’s Hugo Awards were announced this past weekend, and brought with them a record-breaking number of nods for author Seanan McGuire. The annual awards recognising the best in science-fiction and fantasy this year see McGuire up for four awards under both her own name and her pen name, Mira Grant, with two nominees in one of those categories. As McGuire noted on her own blog: ‘here are my firsts for this year: First woman to appear on the ballot four times in fiction categories alone. First person to appear on the ballot five times in a single year. First person to appear on the ballot with a purely self-published work.’ She added: ‘I have eaten nothing but ice cream today. I have cried a lot.’

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BookMachine Oxford March [REVIEW]

Jonathan Davis (Chandos Publishing), who you might have seen on Twitter as @canadiancat has written this comprehensive review of BookMachine Oxford with Richard Sullivan – a great summary for those who missed it.

If BookMachine is “the most fun you can have with your clothes on”, the latest gathering had no problem in filling up the top-floor of Oxford’s House Bar on Wednesday night.

With a new, and untested, approach for BookMachine Oxford, organised by wunder-kind, Charly Ford of Osprey and sponsored by recruitment specialists, Atwood-Tate, the evening started with a short talk from Richard Sullivan, Managing Director of Osprey Publishing.

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Body of Nobel Prize-winning poet Pablo Neruda exhumed

In fascinating news that may have been lost among word of death of a more recent vintage, the body of Nobel Prize-winning Chilean poet Pablo Neruda has been exhumed in a bid to discover whether he died of prostate cancer – as is stated on his death certificate – or if he was, in fact, murdered in September 1973 by an agent of the dictator Augusto Pinochet. There now follows a pause, the better that you may aver that you are familiar with the works of Pablo Neruda.

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6 Questions for Amanda Close of Random House, on launch of book discovery Facebook app BookScout [INTERVIEW]

BookScout

Worried about Amazon buying up GoodReads? Have no fear: Random House, Inc have launched BookScout a new social book discovery app on Facebook. The app allows readers to create and organize their own digital bookshelves and explore friends’ bookshelves to learn what others are reading. BookScout encourages organic word-of-mouth recommendations as people can share what they’re currently reading with their Facebook friends, tag books they’d like to read, and keep track of books they’ve read. The app also provides personalized book recommendations from all publishers, and includes links to major retailers so people can easily purchase print books and eBooks they’re interested in.

Sophie asked Amanda Close, SVP Digital Marketplace Development, some more questions to find out why the app has been made, what the plans are for future and how the analytics are forming future growth strategies…

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5 books to read before running the London Marathon

Co-instigator of BookMachine, Gavin, is running the London Marathon on 21st April in support of Book Aid.

It’s very tempting, when training for a marathon, to spend as much time reading about the theory of running, as actually running. If you’ve fallen in to this trap, and I certainly did for a while, you’re as well to make sure that you’re reading the right stuff. Here are my top 5 must reads about running…

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BookMachine Oxford March [REVIEW II]

Bea Longworth is director and co-founder at Whooc Publishing Ltd, a fledgling startup making first-person fiction apps for young adults under its Freed Fiction imprint. 
 

A few minutes after arriving at House Bar, I felt a tap on my shoulder. “Is there going to be a talk or something?” It was a valid question – Wednesday night marked the debut of BookMachine Oxford’s ‘With…’ event format.

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Jim Carrey’s metaphysical children’s book is a thing now

‘It’s called How Roland Rolls, and if you wanna know about it, it’s at Roland, at howrolandrolls.com, and I’m gonna self-publish, ’cause that’s just the world right now and I think it’s cool, and it’s gonna be beautifully illustrated, and it’s a story about a wave named Roland, who’s afraid that one day when he hits the beach, his life will be over, but when he gets deep, he’s struck by the notion he’s not just the wave, he’s the great big wide ocean. So it’s a metaphysical children’s book and it deals with a lot of serious things in a really fun way, and I think kids are gonna like it and parents are gonna go to bed feeling a little safer.’

So sayeth Jim Carrey – noted metaphysicist, courter of Emma Stone and sometime arse-speaker – in an interview with HitFix, ostensibly to promote his latest cinematic exploration of the hidden chasms of the soul, The Incredible Burt Wonderstone, which only seems like it should have been directed by Terrence Malick, because of all the metaphysics.

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