Attend the Self-Publishing Summit

Ever since 50 Shades of Grey landed on bookshelves, however well hidden, the talk of self-publishing has gone up several decibels. There are now authors saying publishers are no longer needed, stories of great success and precious money thrown away for murky services.

Each year, market-leading self-publishing company New Generation Publishing runs the Self-Publishing Summit, taking place this year at King’s College London on 9th November, to help define the opportunities within the hyperbole and to provide wide-range advice from industry professionals.

And this year the Summit will see some exceptional panels look at the key topics for writers – including the role of agents, editing, production marketing, sales, as well as an overview of the industry and a final Q&A. There will also be a chance to speak to the panelists and fellow attendees during coffee breaks.

The panels includes top publishers, agents, editors, authors, journalists and marketers – an opportunity not to be missed for aspiring, or published, writers.

Tickets for the event cost £34.99 (+VAT) and are booked on a first come first served basis. The event is sponsored by Ingram Spark and you can see full details of the event and can book your tickets by clicking here.

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R.I.P. Tom Clancy

Mega-selling thriller writer Tom Clancy has died, of undisclosed causes, in hospital in his hometown of Baltimore, following a short illness. He was 66, and is survived by his wife and five children (four from a previous marriage). 17 of his 18 novels reached number one on the New York Times bestsellers list, and 100 million copies of those novels are in print. Command Authority, his 19th (co-written with Mark Greaney, who also worked with Clancy on his prior two novels), is due for publication on 3 December.

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BookMachine Brighton [REVIEW]

As the shadow cabinet were camped out in Brighton’s hotel’s trying to kickstart their policy campaign at the Labour party conference, I joined a small but eager group of publishing people in an independent café to discuss our own policies on how to encourage more people to read and reinvent the often struggling but wonderful book industry.

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Yesterday’s Luggage [an author’s tale]

Rob ShermanRob Sherman is a 25 year-old writer and musician from London. His favourite topics include wholegrain, gods with more than one face, and cryptozoology, as well as his own suppurating, horrific body. This is his first guest blog post on BookMachine.

My name is Rob Sherman, or elsewhere the Hogherd, and I would like to tell you the story of how I came by this second, more mythical moniker. It is the story of how I became a full-time author, an occupation of which I have dreamed since I was very small. It is a story that I could not replicate at any other time in history; as tellers of stories, we live in a time when life has never been easier, harder, or more terrifying, and when a combination of luck and a strong lifting arm can lead to one of the largest publishers in the world taking a punt on one’s ludicrous idea. As I say, my story is one that more and more young writers can tell, and are being given the opportunity to tell, by the rise of the digital environment.

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5 Questions for Sophie Kahan [INTERVIEW]

sophieSophie Kahan has a great job. She is the Manager of Publisher Promotions at KOBO. As part of her role, she develops eBook promotions for retailers such as Indigo Books & Music, Kobo’s award-winning eReaders and apps. She also partakes in events including Book Expo America and the London Book Fair. Tahira Rahemtulla interviews Sophie, ahead of her talk at BookMachine Toronto.

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BookMachine Everywhere [REVIEW]

This is a guest post from Charlotte Whitbread, Business Manager, at Book Industry Communications Ltd.

On 25 September 2013 BookMachine (@BookMachine) held simultaneous events across the globe, covering 6 cities, 4 countries and 2 continents. With book trade professionals gathering in Barcelona, Brighton, London, New York, Oxford and Toronto, the international nature of the book market has never been felt so keenly as it was for me then, in the depths of a pub near Great Portland Street! Books may be evolving faster and travelling further than ever, but the pub was certainly not: no card payments under £5 – it’s 2013, not 1302 my good barman. However, thanks to generous sponsor PLS (A loyal BIC Member! @BIC1UK), there was wine a plenty.

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Radio 4 highlighting work of publishers through history

BBC Radio 4, the nation’s well-meaning uncle, is this week broadcasting a five part series, Publishing Lives, whose title encompasses its dual purpose of providing capsule biographies of significant figures in the development of publishing and its seeming reassurance that the current state of flux in which the industry finds itself is merely the latest iteration of several crises already endured over the past 200 years, and that it too shall pass. In each of its five 15 minute episodes, Robert McCrum (previously literary editor of the Observer, and before that editorial director of Faber & Faber for close to two decades) and his producer Melissa Fitzgerald look at the stories behind a different publishing imprint – Murray, Macmillan, Penguin, Weidenfeld, Faber – and consider how their findings illuminate the present.

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Amazon announces latest line of Kindle Fires

Amazon has revealed the latest additions to its line of Kindles, with three new models seeing staggered releases in the US in the run-up to the Christmas shopping season. First to be released is the upgraded Kindle Fire HD, which keeps the 1280×800 resolution 7″ screen of the previous generation but switches out that model’s 1.2GHz processor for a 1.5GHz and is slightly more compact overall. It’s out on 2 October and costs $139 (around £86). Here’s an artist’s impression of its packaging:

malibu stacy hat

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Atlas Shrugged adaptation needs help, fails to see irony

You’d be forgiven at this point for not even realising that a trilogy of films adapting Ayn Rand’s Objectivist 1957 doorstop Atlas Shrugged, beloved of total dicks the world over, is already two thirds completed. That’s because the first two films bombed, commercially and critically, and so there’s a good chance that you are not one of the literally dozens of people who paid to see them, turning ‘who is John Galt?’ from cryptic mantra to genuine question. Part One, released in 2011, has a Metacritic rating of 28 and made back only $4,627,375 of its $20 million budget.

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4 Questions for Gareth Howard [INTERVIEW]

Gareth HowardGareth Howard is CEO and founder of Authoright, a company which provides high-end but affordable author services. They essentially help traditional publishers, self publishing companies, literary agents, indies, literary agents, international book fairs and direct-publishing tech platforms to understand the needs of authors and to future-proof their businesses at a time of change. Authoright are proud sponsors of BookMachine New York. Fabrizio Luccitti interviews Gareth for BookMachine.

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