Puffin imprint

Creating a long-lasting brand: Tips from the Puffin imprint

BookMachine wanted to find out more about Puffin and how the successful imprint has stood the test of time. This is a guest interview with Amanda Punter, Publishing Director.

Amanda began her career at Scholastic Children’s books where she worked with authors such as Markus Zusak and Philip Reeve. She then moved to Puffin where she became Editorial Director and subsequently Publisher for YA fiction. In 2011 she was appointed Publishing Director for  Puffin fiction – a list that includes Puffin Classics and Roald Dahl, as well as global superstar authors Jeff Kinney (Diary of a Wimpy Kid) and John Green (The Fault in Our Stars). Puffin is part of Penguin Random House Children’s.

1. Why do you think the Puffin imprint has stood the test of time?

The two biggest reasons are I think interlinked.

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Sleater-Kinney’s Carrie Brownstein releasing memoir

It’s already been a big year for feminist musical icons in publishing, what with Kim Gordon’s recently released memoir Girl in a Band, Chrissie Hynde’s recently announced, as-yet-untitled memoir, and PJ Harvey’s forthcoming book of poetry. Now there’s one more to add to the list, with the news that Sleater-Kinney guitarist and vocalist Carrie Brownstein will also release a memoir – entitled Hunger Makes Me A Modern Girl – on 27 October through Penguin.

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SEO Tips for Publishers

5 SEO Tips for Publishers and Authors

This is a guest post by Georgiana Ghiciuc. Georgiana is lead content strategist for Beaglecat, an inbound marketing agency with clients in Austria, Germany and the US.

SEO can be life changing, when you know the rules of the game.

SEO Tips for Publishers

Source: Pixabay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Over the past few years, most publishers have been exposed to the idea that, unless you follow a number of SEO guidelines, Google won’t index you, people won’t read your work and you will endure eternal oblivion.

As with everything, SEO rules should be taken with a pinch of salt. Here are some basic tips to help you rank better.

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Waterstones and HarperCollins partner for Killer Crime Festival

Starting tomorrow and running into Saturday (13 and 14 March), Waterstones and HarperCollins are partnering for the Killer Crime Festival, billed as the first virtual crime festival, taking place both online and irl, i.e. in Waterstones branches across the county. The festival sees authors, scriptwriters, criminal psychologists, ex-cops and ex-prisoners in conversation in sessions on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus and, in a startling innovation that’ll surely amount to nothing, face to face with their audiences.

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Copywrite

All authors need the right representation

This is a guest post from Tom Chalmers, Managing Director at IPR License.

Authors are more committed to their agent than to their publisher. That is according to early results from the “Do You Love Your Publisher?” survey for traditionally published authors co-produced by Jane Friedman in the States and Harry Bingham in the UK. However, when asked about the possibility of self-publishing, only a minority of authors were reported to be excited at the prospect, with the majority (75 per cent), either neutral or horrified at the thought of taking control.

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XML

Five things they know about XML that you don’t

This is a guest post from Emily and Nic Gibson. They are both directors of Corbas Consulting Ltd and each have over 15 years’ publishing experience, mostly in editorial, print and digital production.

XML

Credit: Thinkstock/BrAt_PiKaChU

Knowledge is everything they say. To help you get ahead, here are the five things they know about XML that you don’t.

1. You are using XML every day

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Publishing

What I wish someone had told me about publishing

This is a guest post from Alice Murphy-Pyle. Alice is Marketing Manager at Transworld Books, an imprint of Penguin Random House. Follow her on Twitter @alicemurphypyle

“Learn digital skills!’ people bellow when you try to get into publishing. ‘It’s the future!’

Well. It is and it isn’t.

When I started in publishing I did bring some digital skills with me – not exactly shaking the industry foundations, but enough to get by. I quickly learnt, however, that marketing is about much more.

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BTBS supporting internships in the UK Book Trade

Getting a first job in publishing is extremely competitive, which means that employers are often able to offer internships as completely unpaid positions. Taking an unpaid internship can cost an individual £926 a month in London or £804 in Manchester, and as a result internships can be unfair as only the wealthy can afford to take them.

A new scheme launched by David Hicks, CEO of the Book Trade Charity (BTBS) at the Publishing Scotland Conference last month will cover those in “low paid” internships who need extra support to afford these opportunities offered within the Book Trade, with travel, accommodation and living costs. The grant will be paid for a maximum of six months, and there are certain entry requirements which need to be met.

David Hicks said: “This particular programme recognises that it is difficult for young people to get a foot on the ladder in today’s rapidly-changing industry and we will be delighted if our assistance can help overcome some basis obstacles.”

If you are applying for internships within the UK Book Trade, and are under 30 then this scheme is for you. Click here to find and more and register.

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IPG award

5 Questions for Tom Bonnick, IPG winner

Tom Bonnick is Business Development Manager at Nosy Crow, and winner of the IPG Young Independent Publisher of the Year award at last week’s awards. We wanted to find out more.

1) Nosy Crow are winning all the awards at the moment – what a great time for your team to be rewarded for all your efforts. What do you think the key to all the success is?

A number of things! It’s an incredible company, filled with people who are immensely creative, intelligent and passionate about what they do. I think our small size and independence help: being small means that we’re able to act and make decisions quickly, and being independent not only allows us to experiment with new ideas, but also means that we have to absolutely believe in every book and app that we publish (our founder and managing director is fond of saying that it’s money she could otherwise be spending on cheese and wine). Most importantly, we work with absolutely amazing authors and illustrators to make incredible books.

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WYSIWYG

Corporate Social Responsibility: Not just for hippies

This is a guest post from Jasmin Kirkbride. Jasmin is a regular blogger for BookMachine and Editorial Assistant at Periscope Books (part of Garnet Publishing). She is also a published author and you can find her on Twitter @jasminkirkbride

(for further discussion on how CSR adds value to your business, you might like to attend the OPG Summer Conference in Oxford)

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has become an increasingly important part of corporate identities during the last decade. Environmental and social concerns have become core, not just to forerunners such as The Body Shop and Timberland, but even huge corporations such as Starbucks, Unilever, and Walt Disney. The question remains, however: will a commitment to CSR add value to your business as a Publisher?

Defining CSR

In its simplest form, CSR focuses on a triple bottom line of social, environmental and financial responsibility. In an increasing number of countries there are laws stating that, to a greater or lesser degree, each business should be responsible for its actions. Many businesses are choosing to go beyond simple compliance, though, and are creating CSR guidelines and commitments of their own.

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