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Stacie copy

How to pick the best cover image ever

This is a guest blog post from Stacie Vander Pol. Stacie is a marketing entrepreneur with nearly 10 years of dedication to self-publishing. Through her experience publishing hundreds of titles, she knows first-hand that the key to a successful book is more than great writing; it’s also great marketing. Stacie’s passion to support self-published authors was the inspiration behind her latest endeavor, CoverDesignStudio.com.

Do you know the fastest way to connect with potential readers? Your book cover image. That’s because we connect with pictures faster and more easily than we do with words, which makes images ideal for attracting instant attention. Images are so effective, you rarely see a book without one.

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Sara Donaldson - Freelance

5 tips to break the freelance famine

This is a guest blog from Sara Donaldson. Sara is a freelance editor with an eye for a mystery. When not editing a range of projects (mostly non-fiction) she can be found with her Sherlock hat on as a professional genealogist. You can find her on Twitter @psychodwarf

No matter how hard a freelancer likes to pretend that they have a full schedule – all of the time – for many freelancers there are times when there is no work coming in. It may be because a project has unexpectedly failed, it may be because work naturally comes in waves (imagine the rush to get stuff out for Christmas, then nothing in January), or it may be that there is just no work coming their way. Sometimes it’s all down to lack of marketing and ‘getting yourself out there’ but sometimes it’s just the way the cookie crumbles. Whatever the reason, at some point, even the most in demand freelancer will find themselves twiddling their thumbs and looking at a blank slot in their diary.

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Working in Publishing

Three things I learned that made working in publishing bearable

This is a guest post from Carl Pappenheim, owner of Spineless Classics about Working in Publishing (sponsor of BookMachine Oxford on November 6).

Publishing is comfortably the most glamorous and educational industry going (well, after tech support of course) but working with text can be a trial.  Whether it’s a poorly formatted lengthy terms-of-business from a bureaucratic behemoth who want to give you a license, or just a poorly transcribed manuscript that was typed up by somebody’s myopic aunty on a Wordstar electric typewriter, at some point you’re going to be tearing at your elegantly coiffed hair with frustration at all the time you’re wasting filling in missing full-stops instead of getting into an event early enough to complain about the free wine.  I personally find such misuses of my time very trying, so in a generous attempt to lessen the misery for others I present to you three things that have greatly reduced my stress of working in publishing over the past few years.

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Book Marketing

5 Steps To Marketing Your Book Now

This is a guest post about book marketing from Justine Schofield, Development Director, at Pubslush (sponsor of next month’s BookMachine NYC).

Grab your tickets for BookMachine NYC here.

 

In reality, if you’re still in the process of writing a book that you hope will one day reach a widespread audience, you’re not quite at the point where you should be marketing your book. You are, however, most certainly at the point where you should be marketing yourself as an author.

What do I mean by marketing yourself as an author? You should be building your author platform, which includes finding, engaging and building connections with your audience. Here are 5 steps that will help you do just that and, before you know it, you’ll be marketing your book to the people who actually want to read it. Sounds like a good plan, right?

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BookMachine’s blook: the project and the process

So, you may have heard, BookMachine have teamed up with Kingston University Press to publish a collection of blog posts. It’s called Snapshots: Bookmachine on digital, discoverability and collaboration and will be available in print and as an ebook. The blook was edited, designed and produced by a small team of students with next-to-no experience in book production, and they had just 7 weeks do it in. Sounds like a tall order? This is how we did it …

Lecturers Anna Faherty and Judith Watts from Kingston University’s Publishing MA course instigated, organised and have overseen the process. Without their round-the-clock dedication this project wouldn’t have even made it out of the pipeline.

They appointed an editor and project manager from the course (myself) to contact the 46 authors and contributors, collate the manuscript, brief the students and communicate with everyone (a lot).

Entrusted with content from some of the biggest names in the industry, what the student production team achieved in the given time was no mean feat. They took the basic manuscript and copy-edited, designed, typeset, proofread and converted it into an ebook – all the while juggling their other deadlines, internships and jobs.

And the result? We now have a professional-looking product that will sit proudly on our bookshelves (and e-readers) for years to come, and the practical knowledge and experience we need to fuel our future careers.

So take two amazing tutors, a dynamic and future-focused client and students with buckets full of enthusiasm, and you can get a lot more done than you might think.

You can read more about the blook here, or meet the team and get a sneak preview at BookMachine’s event at The London Book Fair.

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Fifty Shades of Backlist Fiction

Judith SummersThis is a guest post from author Judith Summers, who is currently storming the Kindle charts with her book Dear Sister.

I’ve been a No.5  bestseller in the past, I’ve  been a No.4 bestseller – but it’s taken thirty years of being an author, ten published books and the advent of Kindle  for me to hit  the No.1  spot . Now I’ve finally scored – and with my  first published novel.

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The mysterious art of book rights

Tom-pic1Tom Chalmers is Managing Director at IPR License.

Are all authors fully aware of all the rights they hold to their work? Are too many missing out on potential revenue streams by ignoring overseas markets? How many understand their ownership of worldwide book rights?

The sometimes apparently mysterious art of book rights can often be misunderstood or simply ignored. Writers write and then the book sells in vast quantities all over the world. That’s how it works, doesn’t it?

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5 books to read before running the London Marathon

Co-instigator of BookMachine, Gavin, is running the London Marathon on 21st April in support of Book Aid.

It’s very tempting, when training for a marathon, to spend as much time reading about the theory of running, as actually running. If you’ve fallen in to this trap, and I certainly did for a while, you’re as well to make sure that you’re reading the right stuff. Here are my top 5 must reads about running…

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How publishing for different devices impacts design [SPONSORED POST]

Many design companies, like us here at HL Studios, come from a print or web-based background and have had to do some serious upgrading (of software, equipment and especially skills) to keep up with the multitude of digital devices available on the market today. Designing for these devices is quite complex, as each device has different characteristics that impact on the user experience.

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